Make Your Own Condiments

Make Your Own Condiments
June 26, 2014

Making your own condiments is fun, easy, and allows you to use higher-quality ingredients.

 

Omega Institute Make Your Own Condiments by Suzanne Boothby

No summer table is complete without the three major condiments: ketchup, mustard, and mayonnaise. The standard versions of these favorites come in plastic bottles and usually contain sugar and high fructose corn syrup along with soybean oil—a partially hydrogenated vegetable oil that has been shown to raise bad cholesterol levels and contribute to inflammation and insulin resistance.

Following are healthy takes on classic condiment recipes you can try instead. See for yourself how well they compare to the store-bought versions.

Ketchup
This recipe uses maple syrup, which contains polyphenols known to help control blood sugar levels along with other antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds that contribute to good health.

Makes about 1 quart

Ingredients
3 cups canned (or homemade) organic tomato paste
1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
1/4 cup organic maple syrup
4 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce (look for gluten-free versions, if you are avoiding gluten)
2 teaspoons sea salt
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon onion powder

Directions
Combine all ingredients in a bowl, stirring well. Transfer to a one-quart mason jar. Use within two months.

Mustard
Mustard seeds have been used for centuries for their medicinal properties. Mustard is related to broccoli and cabbage, which are known for their disease-fighting properties.

Makes about 1 cup

Ingredients
6 tablespoons mustard seeds (brown, yellow, or a combination)
1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
1 shallot, minced
1 teaspoon sea salt

Directions
Combine all ingredients in a glass bowl and refrigerate overnight, covered. Transfer mixture to a blender or food processor and mix until you get your desired texture. Leave it chunky or blend smooth. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

Mayonnaise
Look for pasture-raised eggs, which contain up to 20 times more omega-3 fatty acids (the good fats) than eggs that come from a factory farm.

Makes 1-1/2 cups

Ingredients
1 whole egg and 1 egg yolk (room temperature)
1 teaspoon dry mustard
2 tablespoons lemon juice 
3/4 cup olive oil (or sunflower, canola, or avocado oil)
sea salt to taste

Directions
Combine all ingredients except the oil in a high-speed blender or food processor. Blend for about 15 seconds and then slowly add oil and blend for another 45 seconds or so. Keeps in the fridge for about 2 weeks. 

© Omega Institute for Holistic Studies

 

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