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Omega Institute Can Contemplative Practice Teach Us to Think Better by Daniel P. Barbezat and Mirabai Bush
One of the claims of higher education, and particularly of liberal arts colleges, is that we teach students how to think. What does this actually mean? Surely our students can think, so in what sense do they need to be taught to think? Maybe it means that we aid them in developing their analytical problem-solving skills and their ability to integrate different aspects of situations creatively. Certainly one of the goals of contemplative exercises is to develop these skills. More
Omega Institute Compassion in Action by Ram Dass
Compassion in action is paradoxical and mysterious. It is absolute, yet continually changing. It accepts that everything is happening exactly as it should, and it works with a full-hearted commitment to change. More
Mindfulness does not belong to Christianity, Buddhism, or Taoism, just as the breath we inhale and exhale does not belong to any one of us. Everywhere human beings have lived, we have needed to cultivate attention; whether it was for hunting, fashioning tools or clothes, or intellectual pursuits. We have always needed compassion to live in harmony and enjoy our lives. Humans from every culture have developed wisdom to ask the big questions of life. These universal practices have been cultivated throughout millennia—or, we may say, they have cultivated us. More
Stephanie Coontz
An Interview With Stephanie Coontz
Omega: You say marriage has changed more in the past 30 years than in the past 3,000 years. You’ve said that the very traits that make marriage in our contemporary society more rewarding have also made it less stable. How so? More
Marriage and Gender Equality Today
An Interview With Stephanie Coontz
Omega: You’ve noted that the gains of feminism in achieving gender equality interact in contradictory ways with growing economic inequality. What is the most urgent role of feminism going forward?  More
Omega Institute Navigating Our Differences by Daniel P. Barbezat and Mirabai Bush
One of the great advances in higher education over the past 50 years has been the increase in variation among students, faculty, administration, and staff. This has deepened the learning within classrooms, greatly enriched both our institutions and our society, and given opportunities to a far greater number of people than ever before. We believe it is important to stress “variation” rather than “diversity” because as difference (diversity) rises, we need to keep a focus on our common connection (variation). We acknowledge difference and also hold our commonality. More
Omega Institute The Science of Mindfulness by Daniel Rechtschaffen
In practicing mindfulness, we can learn to effectively integrate different parts of the brain and mediate internal conflicts. There is a basic neuroscience concept, “Nerve cells that fire together, wire together.” Due to recent findings of neural plasticity, which is the ability for the connections in our brains to change and adapt throughout our lives, we now understand that our brains can generate stronger and healthier neural connections based on our mental habits. More
Creating a Global Culture of Equality and Care
What does it mean to be a man or woman today?  What will it mean in the future? How can we grow out of old roles that stifle us? How can we move from a culture of violence to a culture of care? How can we transcend what we have now to a world in which we can be fully human—together? More
Omega Institute Is Overwhelm Your New Normal?
We live in a culture of stress and overwhelm. Most people are juggling work, friends, family, health, travel, and that's if all is well.  Here's a pretty typical scene: More

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