Sustainable Living

Find a workshop

08/28/2015 to 08/30/2015
Marisa McClellan
How to Can, Process, Infuse & Dehydrate
In this workshop with popular food writer Marisa McClellan, we learn a variety of food preservation skills. More
Location:
Rhinebeck, NY
09/20/2015 to 09/25/2015
Wendy Hollender
Sharpen your colored pencils and prepare to learn botanical drawing techniques with Wendy Hollender. More
Location:
Rhinebeck, NY
10/09/2015 to 10/11/2015
Vandana Shiva
Cultivating the Commons
Seed diversity make up a strong underpinning of our economy, nutrition, vitality, and community resilience. In this special workshop, we cultivate a greater awareness and understanding of seeds and the difficulties and opportunities ahead. More
Location:
Rhinebeck, NY

Pages

08/28/2015 to 08/30/2015
Marisa McClellan
How to Can, Process, Infuse & Dehydrate
In this workshop with popular food writer Marisa McClellan, we learn a variety of food preservation skills. More
Location:
Rhinebeck, NY
09/20/2015 to 09/25/2015
Wendy Hollender
Sharpen your colored pencils and prepare to learn botanical drawing techniques with Wendy Hollender. More
Location:
Rhinebeck, NY
10/09/2015 to 10/11/2015
Vandana Shiva
Cultivating the Commons
Seed diversity make up a strong underpinning of our economy, nutrition, vitality, and community resilience. In this special workshop, we cultivate a greater awareness and understanding of seeds and the difficulties and opportunities ahead. More
Location:
Rhinebeck, NY

Pages

Throughout nature, we can find useful examples of solutions to systemic engineering problems. Janine Benyus explains how engineers and architects are dealing with the problem of birds flying into glass windows by studying how spiders keep birds from flying into their webs. Watch Janine Benyus at the Where We Go From Here conference via free live stream. More
The fastest way to achieve personal transformation is to change who it is we aspire to be when we grow up. Janine Benyus asks, "What if we aspire to be like nature when we grow up?" That, she explains, is what biomimicry is all about. Explore more from Janine Benyus More
During Omega’s six-week Ecological Literacy Immersion (ELIP) program, Barton Kirk and Pete A. Muñoz led a permaculture project to build a rain garden—and built community along the way. Although it took 30 people a day and a half to build this particular rain garden at Omega, Kirk and Muñoz say that creating a rain garden is something anyone can do. Learn more about the ELIP program         More
Omega Institute How to Create a Lasagna Garden
Sheet mulching, or lasagna gardening is one of the fastest ways to start a garden and create healthy soil. See how students in the Ecological Literacy Immersion Program created a lasagna garden on Omega’s campus with Tama Jackson from AppleSeed Permaculture.   More
Omega Institute Janine Benyus: Design By Nature 2012: Gecko Technology
In this clip from her talk at the 2012 Design by Nature conference at Omega, Janine Benyus, a pioneer in the biomimicry movement, talks about how gecko technology is influencing the people who make our world. She says, “…a sustainable world already exists…and now it really just takes quieting human cleverness at this point.”   Watch Janine Benyus via the Where We Go From Here Conference Live Stream   More
Omega Institute Carter Majora Do What You Can
Majora Carter, an eco-entrepreneur and founder of Sustainable South Bronx and The Majora Carter Group, encourages you to do what you can—even if it’s something small—to make the world a better place for everyone. When you understand your power is something that can be exercised for the greater good, then all things are possible, including a sustainable planet.   More
We love our planet—that's why we think of every day as Earth Day. Omega's teachers agree, and they've got some suggestions for how you can make small changes in your life that will make a difference for all of us. Check out their tips then share your suggestions with us here.   More
Bill McKibben, founder of the grassroots climate campaign 350.org, shares his insights and opinion on the importance of shifting the economy away from fossil fuel subsidies. The talk was delivered at the New Economics Institute's Strategies for a New Economy Conference in 2012, where Omega was a sponsor. More
Bill McKibben, a world renowned author and founder of the grassroots climate campaign 350.org, shares his observations on climate change, the economic and social benefits of supporting local agriculture, and how he used his passion for environmental sustainability to start a movement. The talk was delivered at the New Economics Institute's Strategies for a New Economy Conference in 2012, where Omega was a sponsor.   More
Bill McKibben, founder of the grassroots climate campaign 350.org, explains the impact climate change has had in Bangladesh and how what he saw there inspired him to start a movement. The talk was delivered at the New Economics Institute's Strategies for a New Economy Conference in 2012, where Omega was a sponsor. More

Pages

Omega Institute Oysters Return to New York Harbor
New York City was once the oyster capital of the world. With more than 350 square miles of oyster beds in New York Harbor, it's estimated that at one point New York contained half of the world's oysters. Just about 100 years ago, the last of this abundant resource was deemed too polluted to eat and the oyster slipped out of our diet and into history books. More
Omega Center for Sustainable Living Where We Go From Here 2014 resource guide
Where We Go From Here: Building the Collaborative Commons
Robert "Skip" Backus, Omega CEO and Founder of the Omega Center for Sustainable Living (OCSL)Laura Weiland, Assistant Director, Omega Center for Sustainable Living (OCSL)Bios: Robert “Skip” BackusLaura Weiland More
Omega Institute 4 Ways to Deepen Your Connection With Nature
Deepening your connection to nature doesn't mean you need to find a remote patch of wilderness and spend weeks living off the land while sleeping in a lean-to. It doesn't mean that you need to devote so much of your free time to being outside that it becomes a part-time job. More than anything, deepening your connection to nature requires cultivating awareness and attention. Here are four practices you can do anywhere, even if the most natural place you have access to is a city park. 1. Pay Attention to Place More
Omega Institute Nature Meditation 101
What: During nature meditation, you focus on one or more of the following: the sights, sounds, smells, or even the taste or feel of nature. Although nature meditation is typically performed outdoors, there are also nature-themed guided visualizations you can do indoors. Types: There are a number of ways to meditate with nature, including a sunset meditation, labyrinth meditation, or tree meditation. You can also practice walking meditation and standing meditation outside, or while concentrating on a nature-based theme inside. More
Omega Institute Forest Bathing
The Healing Potential of a Walk in the Woods
Spending time outside is instinctive and intuitive. After all, we evolved in tandem with the natural world, though most of us—especially Americans—don't spend much time there anymore. But as anyone who heads out for a walk or travels into the countryside for a weekend knows, being outdoors makes us feel good. More
Omega Institute Hope for Full-Spectrum Sustainability: An Interview With David W. Orr
An Interview with David W. Orr
Omega: You have been instrumental in The Oberlin Project, which envisions a form of "full-spectrum sustainability" in the city of Oberlin, Ohio, where you are distinguished professor of environmental studies and politics at Oberlin College. More
Omega Institute Measuring Our Success as a Society
Moving Beyond the GDP
The saying "what gets measured, gets managed" is the business equivalent of the idea that our thoughts shape our reality. We can also apply the concept to society: how we measure our success (what we pay attention to) indicates what we value, and that in turn shapes our culture and civilization. What are we currently paying attention to? How are we measuring our success? And do we want to measure (pay attention to) something else if we want to create a more inclusive, equitable, just, and ecologically sustainable society? More

Pages