FIND A WORKSHOP

FIND A WORKSHOP

Conference Schedule

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18

3:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m. Arrival & Check-In 

6:00 p.m.–7:15 p.m. Dinner

8:00 p.m.–8:10 p.m. Conference Welcome & Introduction

8:15 p.m.–8:55 p.m. Opening Keynote Address

Keynote: Tracy W. Gaudet, MD
“A Pivotal Transformation for Health Care in This Country”

This lecture with Tracy Gaudet, the director of the Department of Veterans Affairs' newly established Office of Patient-Centered Care and Cultural Transformation, identifies strategies to influence change within a health-care environment and implement the core concepts for patient-centered care approaches.

Objectives:  Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Explain the concept of a patient-centered approach to medicine and health.
  • Describe how to move a health-care organization from a problem-based diseased-care delivery model to a delivery model that is patient-centered.
  • Discuss the practice of mindfulness and its role in the practice of health-care and the experience of health-care to achieve health, healing, and well-being.

9:00 p.m.–9:55 p.m. Keynote Address

Keynote: Peter A. Levine, PhD

“In an Unspoken Voice: How the Body Releases Trauma & Restores Goodness”

Drawing on more than 40 years as a body-oriented clinician, and a parallel study of stress, biology, and recent developments in the neurosciences, Peter A. Levine, founder of Somatic Experiencing, shows how it is possible to live life robustly with pleasure and creativity, even in the face of the most painful assaults to our humanity (including battlefield trauma). From an evolutionary understanding of the source of trauma to a spiritual dimension of how we can be strengthened by traumatic healing, we explore this journey of recovery and learn to listen to the “unspoken voice of the body.”

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Describe the roots of chronic trauma.
  • Identify the role of body-oriented therapies in releasing trauma.
  • Cite current neuroscience research on trauma and treatment models.
  • Discuss the methods and practice of Somatic Experiencing.
  • Determine the applications of body-oriented treatment to current military needs

 

SATURDAY MORNING

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m. Optional yoga, meditation, and tai chi classes

7:00 a.m.–8:45 a.m. Breakfast

9:00 a.m.–9:45 a.m. Opening & Keynote Address

Keynote: Captain (fmr) Elizabeth A. Stanley, PhD

"Using Mind Fitness to Enhance Performance and Build Resilience"

Former Army Captain Elizabeth A. Stanley shares some of the lessons learned from implementing a Mindfulness-Mased Mind-Fitness Training (MMFT) program with active-duty troops who were preparing for deployment, including United States Marines at Camp Pendleton. Learn how the practice of mindfulness can be used to support recovery from stressful experiences and heal trauma.

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Explain what mind fitness is and how it can be taught
  • Describe how mind fitness can be used to enhance performance (such as during the transition from active service), to build resilience, and to heal and recover from trauma.
  • Cite research with Mindfulness-Based Mind Fitness Training among troops preparing for deployment

9:55 a.m.–10:15 a.m. Keynote Address

Keynote: Dawson Church, PhD
"A Society Without PTSD?”

How did human society overcome past epidemics? The methods used in the past offer cogent lessons for addressing the current PTSD epidemic. PTSD is one of most serious public health problems of the 21st century. The VA estimates that over 500,000 veterans of the recent Middle East wars have PTSD, in addition to 479,000 from the Vietnam era. Each case is estimated to cost society $1.4 million, adding up to more than a trillion dollars in treatment costs in the coming years. How can this fiscal and human catastrophe be avoided? This presentation examines previous public health successes, such as the eradication of cholera, typhoid, smallpox, and polio for answers. Often, a small group of dedicated professionals were responsible for the eradication of a disease. With effective low-cost behavioral therapies for PTSD now available, rapid implementation can be modeled on previous epidemiological successes.

Objectives. Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Name two or more conditions that were eliminated due to sustained human effort.
  • Identify at least one method that meets American Psychological Association Division 12 Task Force standards as an "efficacious" treatment for PTSD.
  • Differentiate a behavioral from a non-behavioral PTSD treatment.
  • Identify two or more characteristics of a rapid implementation model.

10:20 a.m.–10:45 a.m. Keynote Address

Keynote: Kevin Berry, MD

“Pain, Stress & Resilience in Military & Veteran Populations”

Based on Samueli Institute research in military and veteran populations, this presentation explores the philosophic underpinnings, science, and evidence about the relief of pain, the management of stress, and the importance of each aspect on human performance and resilience.

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Recognize salutogenesis as a necessary complement to pathogenesis
  • Discuss whole-person whole-system philosophy as a necessary counterpoint to the reductionistic heuristic common to American medicine
  • Explain how whole-person approaches help us identify alternatives to the disease-centric approach and narrowly focused treatments that overlook the person in their social milieu 
  • Describe factors that impact pain, stress, and resilience in the context of the deployment cycle delineated into pre-deployment, deployment, and reintegration phases
  • Recognize how managing major threats to health and well-being require knowledge and behaviors within the life-space
  • Discuss parallels in the military and other populations

10:45 a.m. Break

11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m. CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS

Please choose one concurrent workshop below:

Concurrent Workshop: David J. Kearney, MD

“Introduction to Mindfulness Meditation and Loving-Kindness Meditation”

In this interactive session, we explore simple and accessible meditation practices as taught to veterans with trauma at the Veterans Hospital in Seattle. The session examines mindfulness practices that foster the ability to recognize and let go of ruminative and self-critical tendencies. Loving-Kindness Meditation, which is a method of cultivating kindness for self and others, will also be introduced, as well as the theoretical framework within modern psychology for understanding mindfulness meditation and loving-kindness meditation will be discussed. 

Objectives: Upon completion, participants will be able to:

  • Define Loving-Kindness Meditation and list two elements of its practice.
  • Practice at least two meditation techniques and describe how they can be useful for their patients and for themselves.
  • Describe the broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions and its relationship to loving-kindness meditation.
  • Define Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and list three elements of its practice.
  • Identify clinical manifestations of posttraumatic stress disorder
  • Assess how meditation practices may hold promise for influencing these symptoms

Concurrent Workshop: Claude AnShin Thomas

“The Costs of War, Violence & Denial”

Zen Buddhist priest and decorated Vietnam War veteran Claude AnShin Thomas describes the experience of living with PTSD and how the practice of meditation provides a path to healing and integration.

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Describe how meditation can help explore unexpressed and unresolved issues.
  • Discuss how PTSD affects and damages lives.
  • Identify how meditation can offer support for issues that traditional counseling often cannot address.
  • Recognize how Claude AnShin Thomas's personal odyssey from wounded veterans to healer and teacher can provide a roadmap for recovery from traumatic experience.

Concurrent Workshop: Annie Okerlin, RYT

Adaptive Yoga for Traumatically Injured Service Members”

We discuss the different veterans populations served by the Exalted Warrior Foundation and how the practices of adaptive yoga and iRest Yoga Nidra meditation support recovery and rehabilitation. We also explore how to create a yoga class with awareness for all trauma and injury populations.

Objectives: Upon completion, participants will be better able to:

  • Utilize modifications of poses for amputees, traumatic brain injury sufferers, and those in wheelchairs.
  • Demonstrate proper altering of language to minimize triggering for PTSD sufferers.
  • Create a yoga class with awareness for all injury populations

Concurrent Workshop: Col. (ret.) E.C. Hurley, PhD, LMFT

“EMDR Successive Days Treatment for Complex Combat Trauma: Life-Changing Treatment in a Brief Period”

Retired Army Colonel E.C. Hurley, as director of Soldier Center, provides intensive, successive days EMDR treatment with statistically significant results to active duty military and veterans suffering with complex PTSD. This presentation offers didactic and video presentations of his work and includes discussion of the treatment and approaches. This model offers effective treatment with great continuity of care for our veterans.  

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Discuss EMDR as an evidence-based model of psychotherapy in the treatment of combat trauma.
  • Identify treatment issues in treating complex trauma in brief periods.
  • Describe the efficacy of this approach to PTSD treatment.
  • Recognize outcome measures and what they say about this treatment model.
  • Appraise the implications in the use of EMDR successive days treatment for the veteran population

Concurrent Workshop: Roger Jahnke, OMD

"Tai Chi Easy™ & Qigong: A Healing Mind-Body Journey"

In this experiential session for health-care professionals, we learn that tai chi and qigong are ancient practices scientifically proven to positively influence the body and mind to promote healing. We explore the principles of Tai Chi Easy™ (a streamlined form of tai chi) and qigong in a relaxed atmosphere that promotes healing states of awareness and physical relaxation for practitioners of all levels of ability. Examples of these modalities taught to veterans with PTSD are introduced and explored.

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Identify the medicinal properties of breath, movement, self-massage, and meditation through experience and observation.
  • Describe and practice the concept of four “baskets of practice” - movement, breath practice, self-massage, and meditation to organize and deconstruct all practice sessions.
  • Discuss the “Healer Within” and the medicine within, in simple terms – energetically and physiologically.
  • Recognize and identify the physical and emotional lifestyle signs of medicine being produced within the human system as well as the symptoms of medicine not being produced in the human system.
  • Apply simple traditional Tai Chi Easy™ practices: Chinese qigong and tai chi "vitality enhancement" and meditative movements practices, which can be done sitting, standing, walking, or lying down.

Concurrent Workshop: Laurie Leitch, PhD & Brigadier General (fmr) Loree K. Sutton, MD

“Healing Communities With Trauma”

This is a practical workshop for health-care professionals treating veterans led by the cofounders of Threshold Global Works, which designs and implements projects using the Social Resilience Model to build resiliency-oriented collective intelligence across systems of all sizes—from the military to multinational organizations, villages, and communities. The focus is on how therapists working with trauma can make a difference in the world, beyond caseloads and a narrowly defined practice. Discussion includes translating clinical expertise into broader social good—whether part-time, volunteer, or in a second career, in a local community or beyond.

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Describe the Social Resilience Model
  • Recognize how to avoid medicalizing or pathologizing problems
  • Discuss best practices for working in an unfamiliar culture, organization, or community
  • Define resiliency training in relation to disaster relief

12:30 p.m.–2:00 p.m. Lunch

 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON

2:00 p.m.–2:50 p.m. Opening & Keynote Address

Keynote: Gabor Maté, MD

"Twin Plagues: Trauma & Addictions”

In this Keynote presentation, Gabor Maté explores how addiction is a frequent outcome of trauma, and he also examines how both adult trauma and addictions are superimposed on childhood emotional loss or abuse, alomg with their consequences on brain and personality development.

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Cite the brain developmental effects of childhood trauma.
  • Discuss how the psychological impact of trauma relates to the later onset of addiction.
  • Identify the relationship between childhood trauma, adult PTSD, and addiction.
  • Assess the development of treatment principles based not only on adult behaviors, events, and habits, but on the entire life of the affected individual

2:55 p.m.–3:35 p.m. Keynote Address

Keynote: Frank Ochberg, MD

“Lighting the Sparks of Emotion in a Numb Survivor of Combat"  

Frank Ochberg, a distinguished psychiatrist working with trauma who was part of the team that wrote the original PTSD diagnosis, discusses his understanding of the structure of trauma and effective modalities for working with combat survivors.

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Utilize a "palette" of positive emotion to facilitate a client’s recovery following a traumatic event
  • Identify positive emotions that are lost or diminished due to PTSD
  • Create strategies for treating anhedonia
  • Distinguish flashbacks from autobiographical memories of trauma
  • Generate and modulate flashbacks in a controlled therapeutic setting

3:35 p.m.–3:55 p.m. Break

4:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS

Please choose one concurrent workshop from the list below:

Concurrent Workshop: Peter A. Levine, PhD

“Somatic Experiencing: Working With the Body to Release Trauma & Restore Health”

Trauma is neither a disease nor a disorder, but rather an injury caused by fright, helplessness, and loss. By enlisting the wisdom of the living, sensing body, and engaging our innate capacity to self-regulate high states of arousal and intense emotions, trauma can be transformed. Drawing on more than 40 years as a body-oriented clinician, and a parallel study of stress, biology, and recent developments in the neurosciences, Peter A. Levine explains how Somatic Experiencing can help people live life robustly, with pleasure and creativity, in the face of the most painful assaults to our humanity—as well as in face of the deceptively trivial ones. From an evolutionary understanding of the source of trauma, to a spiritual dimension of how we as human beings can be strengthened by traumatic healing, we learn to listen to the “unspoken voice of the body.”

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Recognize the roots of chronic trauma.
  • Describe the role of body-oriented therapies in releasing trauma.
  • Cite current neuroscience research on trauma and treatment models.
  • Discuss the practical methods and practice of Somatic Experiencing.
  • Examine applications of Somatic Experiencing to the treatment of PTSD.

Concurrent Workshop: Maj. Susan Lynch, JD, E-RYT

Building a Healing Mind-Body Partnership With Combat Veterans to Manage Symptoms of PTSD”

Military culture is unique, self-contained, and often misunderstood. Because only one percent of the American population serves in the Armed Forces, relating to veterans is key to developing a trusting relationship to build the foundation of the healing process and one that fosters the ability to support veterans and their families’ wellness before, during, and after deployment. Learning the yin and yang of military service offers practitioners a framework to incorporate their mind-body skills in a manner that facilitates healing. In this workshop, we explore the culture and experiences that have shaped the military men and women who serve, including the many factors leading us to join the military, such as the value we gain from our service and connection to something greater than ourselves, the sense of belonging provided by military service, building of character, and the depth of the relationships we develop before, during, and after deployments. 

Objectives: Participants will learn:

  • Examine how understanding an individual veteran’s experiences can lead to eliminating cultural barriers and openness to exploring mind-body therapies
  • Discuss the military mindset of service-members before, during, and after deployment
  • Recognize how to relate to veterans and create a safe container to explore wellness
  • Describe how to build practices around a Kosha model that helps empower veterans by providing a gateway to understanding themselves on and off the mat.
  • Identify practical considerations and best practices

Concurrent Workshop: Carla Cassler, DAOM, LAc 

“Healing Trauma in the Military Community: Acupuncture for PTSD”

In this interactive workshop, we explore how ear-based acupuncture provided in a community setting helps resolve and prevent PTSD. Included are demonstrations and treatment opportunities for participants.

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Evaluate acupuncture as a powerful treatment for trauma patterns such as PTSD.
  • Assess how the use of ear acupuncture may help reduce insomnia, anxiety, depression, improve cognitive function, and help foster improved relationships, social function, and community engagement.
  • Explore how acupuncture treatment in a group (community) setting is ideally suited to the treatment needs of veterans, military personnel, and their families.
  • Examine the integration of acupuncture into the mainstream of military health-care delivery (the DoD and VA) as a clinically effective, safe, low cost adjunctive therapy for treatment of trauma, pain, and substance dependence.

Concurrent Workshop: David Feinstein, PhD

“Rapid Treatment of PTSD: Combining Imaginal Exposure With the Stimulation of Acupuncture Points”

"Energy psychology," which stimulates acupuncture points by tapping on them, is proving itself to be a surprisingly rapid and effective treatment for PTSD. Evidence supporting this claim will be reviewed, along with an overview of the approach, possible mechanisms of action, and video demonstrations of its use and effectiveness.

Objectives: Upon completion, participants will be able to:

  • Recount a case where energy psychology helped a veteran rapidly overcome longstanding PTSD.
  • Explain how stimulating acupoints while mentally activating a traumatic memory impacts the brain.
  • Discuss at least one peer-reviewed, randomized, controlled trial investigating the clinical outcome of acupoint tapping with PTSD.

Concurrent Workshop: Michael Marks, PhD

The Invisible Wounds of War & New Treatment Options”

The lead psychologist and director of the PTSD Outpatient Clinic of the Southern Arizona Veterans Affairs Health Care System explores the challenges faced by America's new generation of veterans and the treatment options, such as cognitive behavioral therapies and psycho-education models—including the pioneering SERV (Supportive Education for Returning Veterans) program, a collaborative effort of the Southern Arizona Healthcare System and VA the University of Arizona. The goal of the SERV veterans program of studies is to successfully transition returning veterans into an academic setting by establishing an academic and social framework intended to improve concentration, memory, problem solving, and learning, while minimizing social isolation. A dominant theme in the curriculum emphasizes resiliency, the ability of an individual to bounce back from life’s adversity and cope with stresses and deal with these stresses in healthy ways.

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Recognize the challenges faced by returning veterans
  • Discuss some of the alternative therapeutic models that are being used by the PTSD Outpatient Clinic of the Southern Arizona Veterans Affairs Health Care System.
  • Review the work of the SERV (Supportive Education for Returning Veterans) program, a collaborative effort of the Southern Arizona Healthcare System and VA at the University of Arizona.
  • Cite the professional definition of resiliency and what measures of resiliency have been found to be effective predictors of retention in SERV.
  • Describe what resiliency characteristics can be taught in a classroom setting
  • Identify how appropriate resiliency attitudes can facilitate veterans’ college adjustment and lead to an increase in retention and GPA
 

SATURDAY EVENING

6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m. Dinner

8:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m. Keynote Address

Keynote: Brigadier General (fmr) Loree K. Sutton, MD

“Homeward Bound—Guiding Our Veterans All the Way Home: Equipping Communities to Serve as the Front Lines of Hope & Healing”

Thousands of veterans are returning home from the longest war in our nation’s history. Most come back to civilian communities that are unprepared to engage and integrate them. Many struggle with post-deployment issues that current systems of care are not designed to handle. Too often, the consequences are stigma and isolation, resulting in a needless loss of human potential. This presentation seeks to engage us in reimagining how we, as a nation, can guide our veterans home by equipping communities so they can serve as the front lines of hope and healing. A resilient community provides a safety net that connects needs with resources; it’s a springboard to a successful future. But while most communities have plenty of concern for veterans, they lack adequate ways to effectively respond. Drawing on three decades of experience as an Army psychiatrist and senior military leader, former Brigadier General Loree K. Sutton describes a distinctive model for building a resilient community where veterans’ needs are understood, reintegration resources are coordinated, and veterans and their families develop the social resilience they need to fully rejoin, and contribute to, their community. This work is not charity. It is our national duty.

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Identify the most relevant factor distinguishing the experience of post-9/11 veterans and other veteran cohorts throughout our nation’s history.
  • Cite the definition of social resilience and identify at least two implications that are contributing to the current post-deployment reintegration challenges,
  • Discuss the existing gaps between and within government and community-based programs with respect to building resilience, enhancing recovery and fostering reintegration
  •  Identify at least two actions that are underway to address the above gaps
  • List two or more reasons why neurobiological principles must be synchronized with the experience of community itself to facilitate a network of hope and healing for returning veterans and their family members

 

SUNDAY MORNING

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m. Optional yoga, meditation, and tai chi classes

7:00 a.m.–8:45 a.m. Breakfast

9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m. CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS

Please choose one concurrent workshop from the list below:

Concurrent Workshop: Col. (ret) Pat Lillis, MD, MHA, RYT

“Integrative Medicine: Its Role in the Treatment of PTSD”

Oncologist Pat Lillis, a yoga instructor, cofounder of Warriors at Ease, and a 32-year military veteran with combat experience, describes what the DOD is doing to bring Integrative Medicine into the DOD clinics to make it part of the 'mainstream" with their hospitals and clinics, especially in the treatment of PTSD, and we explore how practitioners can work with this positive trend.

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Discuss the concepts and rationale for using Integrative Medicine 
  • Describe how a large system, which most would think would not accept such 'radical ideas,' did so with great success.
  • Examine continuing challenges and ways other groups might adopt these and other strategies.

Concurrent Workshop: Gabor Maté, MD

"PTSD & Addictions: Close-up & Interactive”

This is an experiential and interactive exploration of the themes touched upon in Gabor Maté's keynote. We explore how addiction is a frequent outcome of trauma and examine how both adult trauma and addictions are superimposed on childhood emotional loss or abuse, as well as their consequences on brain and personality development.

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Review the brain developmental effects of childhood trauma.
  • Relate the psychological impact of trauma to the later onset of addiction.
  • Identify the relationship between childhood trauma, adult PTSD, and addiction.
  • Describe the development of treatment principles based not only on adult behaviors, events and habits, but on the entire life of the affected individual.

Concurrent Workshop: Captain (fmr) Elizabeth A. Stanley, PhD

“Introduction to Mindfulness-Based Mind-Fitness Training” 

This introduction presents the rationale for and components of Mindfulness-Based Mind-Fitness Training, and previews some of the tools and techniques taught in the course.

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Describe the rationale for Mindfulness-Based Mind-Fitness Training (MMFT) and its relationship to military training and recovery from stress and trauma
  • Review the components of the MMFT course.
  • Examine some of the tools and techniques taught in the MMFT course

Concurrent Workshop: Charles R. Kennedy, PhD

“Enhancement of Treatment Outcomes in Combat Veterans Through Attachment-Based Family Interventions: Making Meaning With Loved-Ones”

We explore the alienation that combat-trauma imposes on veterans and their loved ones. This isolation fuels the symptoms of PTSD and erodes the healing bonds of intimate relationships. Participants learn how attachment theory informs the language development that promotes enhanced connection via shared understanding. These shared understandings encourage the elaboration of interpersonal connections that breach alienation and avoidance. 

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Discuss the importance of attachment theory in the treatment of PTSD.
  • Review the use of experiential activities in creation of understanding of PTSD symptoms.
  • Explain the significance of the elaboration of interpersonal connection in the stable healing of trauma.

Concurrent Workshop: Dawson Church, PhD

Complementary & Alternative Medicine & Energy Psychology Remediate PTSD Symptoms in Veterans & Spouses"

This workshop explores a study in which male veterans and their spouses attending six weeklong retreats were assessed for PTSD pre- and post-intervention. Symptoms were evaluated using the PTSD checklist (PCL) to evaluate clinical PTSD. The multimodal intervention used EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) and other Energy Psychology (EP) methods to reduce PTSD symptoms, as well as Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for stress reduction and resource-building. Interventions were delivered in group format as well as individual counseling sessions. As veterans and their spouses both demonstrated substantial symptom reductions in PTSD clinical criteria, the results indicate that a multimodal CAM intervention incorporating EP offers benefits to family members as well as veterans suffering from PTSD.

Objectives: Participants will be better able to:

  • Discuss EFT and other Energy Psychology modalities.
  • Explain the relevance of these modalities for the treatment of PTSD.
  • Cite the clinical criteria used in assessing these modalities.
  • Describe the role of veterans family members in executing treatment plans.

Concurrent Workshop: Frank Ochberg, MD

"Using Ochberg's Counting Method to Master Traumatic Memory"

In this workshop, we draw on illustrations from therapy sessions to explore the use of a "color wheel of positive emotion." Through demonstratations, we see how long-attenuated feelings of joy, serenity, love, and pride can be rekindled. Drawing on other therapy sessions, Frank Ochberg also demonstrates and teaches an efficient and effective method of exposure to terrifying trauma of 40 years' duration.

Objectives: Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be better able to:

  • Utilize a "palette" of positive emotion to facilitate a client’s recovery following a traumatic event
  • Identify positive emotions that are lost or diminished due to PTSD
  • Create strategies for treating anhedonia
  • Distinguish flashbacks from autobiographical memories of trauma
  • Generate and modulate flashbacks in a controlled therapeutic setting
  • Apply the "Counting Method" to clients with PTSD

10:30 a.m.–10:45 p.m. Break

10:45 a.m.–11:25 a.m. Keynote Address

Keynote: Major (fmr) Nisha Money, MD, MPH, ABIHM

“The Promise of Complementary & Alternative Medicine in the Treatment of Trauma Among Active-Duty Military & Veterans”

The chief medical officer for complementary and alternative medicine for the Department of Defense and the VA discusses the growing movement to integrate body-mind-spirit healing modalities that serve as treatment interventions for emotional and physical trauma and also as effective prevention strategies in building resilience. The effects of emotional trauma, TBI (traumatic brain injury), sexual assault, and PTSD, as well as the variety of CAMS modalities that currently show promise in their treatment, will be discussed.

Objectives: Upon completion, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the current movement to bring CAMS (Complimentary & Alternative Medicine) to the treatment of trauma in military personnel and veterans.
  • Cite the core issues facing those who experience trauama.
  • Discuss nontraditional sources of trauma facing soldiers, such as the rising incidence of sexual assault from fellow military personnel.
  • Summarize the basic holistic practice modalities used for treatment of trauma and used in building resilience.

11:30 a.m.–12:00 p.m. Keynote Address

Keynote: Col. Richard P. Petri, MD

"Integrative Medicine in the Military: The Treatment of Trauma & New Approaches to Patient Involvement"

Col. Richard P. Petri, the chief of physical medicine and integrative health services at William Beaumont Army Medical Center at Fort Bliss, Texas, describes recent expansions in soldier care to include nontraditional therapies such as acupuncture, integrative medicine, and holistic interventions to pain, trauma, and PTSD. Since the introduction of these therapies, programs featuring integrative medicine have spread throughout the military and are utilized in combat environments to relieve pain and help alleviate combat stress. The emphasis on the whole person within Integrative Medicine is a new paradigm that actively involves patients with their own healing process.

Objectives: Participants will be better able to:

  • Recognize the spread of Integrative Medicine within the US Army.
  • Discuss the elements of Integrative and Alternative Medicine and the promise it holds for the treatment of chronic pain and PTSD.
  • Describe the potential of Integrative Medicine practices within combat environments.
  • Identify the role of patient involvement within the Integrative Medicine paradigm.

12:05 p.m. Conference Closing

12:30 p.m.–1:45 p.m. Lunch & Departure
 
 
Schedule and speakers are subject to change.