Look Inside: Ecological Literacy Immersion Program | Omega

Look Inside: Ecological Literacy Immersion Program

Look Inside: Ecological Literacy Immersion Program
08/12/2016

Omega's Ecological Literacy Immersion Program (ELIP) provides a unique experience with regenerative thinking and design. Here's a look at some of the talks, experiential intensives, and other happenings from the 2016 program.

 

  • Photo: Gabriella DiGiovanni

    Permaculture pioneer Dave Jacke teaches ELIP students edible forest design. In an edible forest, different species are planted in certain patterns to create a healthy and beautiful ecosystem with a diverse yield. Over time, the garden becomes generally self-maintaining and requires little input.

  • Photo: Helmi Hunin

    ELIP students build a hot compost pile in July's heat using the Berkeley Method of composting. A regular compost pile can take 6 to 12 months before it's ready to use, but when turned every other day, a hot compost pile is ready in as little as 18 days. Students shared responsibility for turning the pile over the course of the immersion.

  • Photo: Gabriella DiGiovanni

    Students explore the woods with author and forest farmer Steve Gabriel and learn about managing woodlots in a sustainable way that supports the long-term health of the forest.

  • Photo: Helmi Hunin

    Student groups are each given a site on Omega's campus to practice design. Mona Naimark and Ricardo Myrick work on analysis of the vegetation and wildlife of their site.

  • Photo: Helmi Hunin

    ELIP students learn about permaculture principles that simulate patterns existing in the living world.

  • Photo: Gabriella DiGiovanni

    Clinical herbalist and wildcrafter Dina Falconi shared the underlying principles that were used in designing her gardens and homestead.

  • Teacher Connor Stedman helps students brainstorm about design solutions after doing a landscape site analysis on the Omega campus. 

  • Photo: Gabriella DiGiovanni

    Learning different methods of tree identification on Omega's campus. Here students are smelling black birch (Betula nigra) twigs, which have a strong scent of wintergreen. This tree species was used to produce wintergreen oil before it was chemically produced.

  • Photo: Helmi Hunin

    Students inoculating mushroom logs, which will provide edible mushrooms in about a year. Mushrooms are one of many useful products that can come from the forest. Others include maple syrup, berries, medicinal plants, nuts, and more.

  • Photo: Gabriella DiGiovanni

    Ken Greene, cofounder of the Hudson Valley Seed Library, talks about the cultural and biological importance of saving seeds. Ken and his team produce organic seeds on their farm and make them commercially available in artfully designed seed packets. They also maintain breeding projects to protect heirloom varieties.

  • Photo: Helmi Hunin

    ELIP 2016 presents their designs to the Omega community.

  • Photo: Gabriella DiGiovanni

    ELIP 2016 presents their designs to the Omega community.

  • Congratulations ELIP 2016 students on a job well done!

© 2016 Omega Institute for Holistic Studies

 

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