| Page 12 | Omega

Learning paths content lists

Contemporary thought leader Panache Desai reveals the importance of redefining what it means to be a human being by embracing and accepting everything about yourself in order to tap into your infinite potential.     More
In this exclusive video panel discussion from Omega, Panache Desai, Elizabeth Lesser, and Brian Weiss discuss the meaning and relevance of heaven and hell. In response to an audience member's inquiry about Hitler and whether he is in heaven or hell, Lesser encourages us not to get wrapped up in questions like that and to instead focus on heaven and hell on earth.       More
Brian Weiss, MD, America’s leading authority in past-life regression therapy, says that if you look closely you’ll see that all the great religions are teaching about the same things: love, compassion, giving, nonviolence, and mindful awareness.                   More
We all have heard that yoga and other mind-body practices are good for us, but how do they impact our brain? Renowned professor, author, and founder of The Center for Mindfulness at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Jon Kabat-Zinn explains some of the science and theory behind why yoga, tai chi, Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, and other mind-body practices can improve the recovery of those who have been wounded.     More
Peter Gold and the Trapeze-Experience™ Team bring the joy, exhilaration, and satisfaction of flying on the trapeze to anyone willing to try. Watch as student Chrissa Pullicino tries the trapeze for the first time. More
Buddhist teacher, nun and author Pema Chödrön is widely known for her insightful, down-to-earth interpretation of Tibetan Buddhism for Western audiences. She reminds us that, although our mind perceives things as being fixed, everything is, in fact, changing all the time. It's this change and impermenance that offers unlimited possibility for freshness, uniqueness and aliveness. More
Watch Byron Katie, best-selling author and founder of The Work, describe her method of getting you out of depression, stress and anxiety—with nothing more than a pen, a piece of paper, and an open mind.   More
Byron Katie, best-selling author and founder of The Work, reveals the stress-producing ways in which we get “in everyone else's business,” while leaving our own business unattended. When we are attentive to ourselves and come from a grounded place, we can also better gauge who to do business with and who not to do business with. More
In this one hour video, contemporary thought leader Panache Desai reveals why every experience in your life—every challenge and every solution—is born from the gift of grace. More
Man receiving acupuncture
The ancient Greek word for wound is trauma. Simply defined, trauma is a deeply disturbing experience that can create extreme stress and overwhelm the body and the mind.  About 70 percent of U.S. adults have experienced a traumatic event at least once in their lives and up to 20 percent of these people can also develop post-traumatic stress, according to the nonprofit organization Sidran Traumatic Stress Institute. More
Drew, who served in the U.S. Army in Iraq in both 2007 and 2008, came to Omega to help heal both his mind and his body. Dealing with a brain injury and post-traumatic stress, he was looking for a holistic way to reset his nervous system. He says returning to civilian life was much harder than his service, and he was not prepared for the difficult transition. “You get caught up and lost, and then you have friends taking their own life,” he said. “I needed somewhere to reset.” More
older woman doing yoga
Omega: Having studied extensively with both B.K.S. Iyengar and his daughter Geeta Iyengar, what have you observed about the role of women in yoga? Joan: One of Mr. Iyengar’s legacies—we call him Guruji—is that he was the first one that taught men and women in the same class. It had been forbidden, but he broke through a lot of Indian taboos in his introduction of yoga to the West, and now everybody can do yoga if they want to. More
Omega: Why did you start to combine mindfulness practices with the tools of cognitive therapy? Zindel: It began with the growing realization that people who are dealing with a mood disorder need to learn ways of looking after themselves when they’re no longer in an acute episode of depression or anxiety. These disorders are recurrent, and they can sometimes develop into chronic disorders. I wanted to find a way of helping people prevent the return of symptoms that could help to break the cycle of recurrence and chronicity. More
Thousands of people have overcome cancer against incredible odds, and Kelly Turner has made a career out of studying these cases—1,500 of them and counting. She calls it radical remission, or people who have experienced a complete reversal of a serious or terminal cancer diagnosis. More
Omega: Can we be mindful or present without knowing it, or is it something we need to practice? Florence: At its core, mindfulness is the innate human capacity to be aware. All human beings come with this capacity to know what’s happening as it’s happening, but we are not trained to access that capacity. It takes continuity and discipline to access what’s already here. This capacity to be aware requires you make a choice to be awake in the present moment with whatever is showing up. More
Omega: When you first started teaching, you've said you were afraid to speak from your heart. How did that change for you? Elena: That fear resulted from the fact that I wasn’t being honest about the life I was leading. I was teaching yoga, and breathing, and sitting, and wasn’t always practicing. It was painful to teach the work so well and not be practicing myself.  Omega: Why do you think so many people hide their true selves? More
Omega: What's the best relationship advice you've ever been given? More
Omega: How did you become an entrepreneur? Bizzie: If I look back at my childhood, I grew up with an “it’s okay to be a boss” mentality. My dad really instilled that in me since I was very young. I can remember being a child and ordering at a restaurant. At four or five, I would have to order for myself and use my manners. My dad always helped me put communication at the forefront of everything that I did. More