| Page 17 | Omega

Learning paths content lists

Thich Nhat Hanh is one of the most respected and recognized Zen masters in the world, as well as being a renowned poet, peace activist, and human rights advocate. Born in Vietnam, and serving as a Buddhist monk since the age of 16, he was one of the founders of the “engaged Buddhism” movement, choosing to lead a contemplative life while working outside the monastery, helping villagers suffering from the devastation of the Vietnam War. More
Yoga teacher Colleen Saidman, christened “The First Lady of Yoga” by the New York Times, discusses how her children have become teachers for her and her husband Rodney Yee. The family unit is an opportunity for revelation because of the unconditional love of parents for children, says the author of Yoga for Life: A Journey to Inner Peace and Freedom. Saidman is also a Jivamukti Yoga® teacher and co-founder of Urban Zen’s Integrative Yoga Therapist Program. More
What is your purpose? Spiritual teacher and yoga therapist, Beryl Bender Birch shares her thoughts on why service will provide you with the greatest sense of self worth and long-lasting happiness.   More
Yoga teacher, Rodney Yee says that you experience awakening when you open your body, then it is no longer a barrier to the world, but the place where you are able to absorb and listen to life all around you. More
Codirector of the Piedmont Yoga Studio, Rodney Yee explains how being fully embodied and present in every moment is the practice of bringing yoga into your life every day. More
A pioneer in the field of mindfulness and education, Daniel Rechtschaffen, MA, discusses meditation, the ancient science of breath, mind, heart and body. More
Gurmukh Kaur Khalsa, the cofounder and director of Golden Bridge Yoga, the premier Kundalini Yoga center in Los Angeles, California, and New York City, discusses the wisdom and magic of this ancient form of yoga. More
Cofounder and director of Golden Bridge Yoga, Gurmukh Kaur Khalsa explores what it means to be a woman who lives and leads with grace and strength. She contends that the next age for humanity will need feminine energy more than ever before. More
Contemporary spiritual master and inspirational visionary, Panache Desai shares why he believes you are here to make a difference by holding a space for peace in the midst of life's daily chaos. More
Contemporary spiritual master and inspirational visionary, Panache Desai explains that once you have embraced consciousness, you will be free to stop fixing yourself, end your inner conflict, and realize that you are divine.   More
Studies have shown that, as far back as in the womb, we make decisions about who we are and what’s possible for us to have (or not have) as it relates to receiving happy, healthy love into our lives. Conclusions like “I am not wanted,” or “I am not enough,” are the assumptions we may have made up as children, when we were far too young to understand that it was our caregivers, and not we ourselves, who were in some way inadequate and deficient in their abilities.   More
Today our minds, our emotions, our relationships, and our bodies are out of kilter. We know it, but we tend to ignore it until something goes very wrong—a scary diagnosis, a broken relationship, the death of a loved one, or simply an inability to function harmoniously in everyday life. When things are a little bad, we read a self-help book or go to a workshop. When they're really bad, we bring in experts to fix the problem—oncologists to address cancer, neurologists to repair the brain, psychologists to help us find peace and understand our family of origin. More
Omega: What do you think of the growing popularity and commercialization of feminism in pop culture? Isabel: It’s fine. Make condoms that say “feminist.” As long as it’s out there. It can take any shape or form or language—just bring it up. More
Omega Institute Mindfulness as a Healing Practice: An Interview With Sister Dang Nghiem
Omega: Why is mindfulness so important for our times? Sister D: When I was in my second year of medical school, I had to make the decision whether to do a four-year program or a five-year program. I was stressing out about it, and in a dream I saw a lot of people on bicycles just plunging down a hill. I stopped at the top of the hill and recognized that there was a little girl sitting on my handlebars. I realized that if I were to plunge down the hill, that girl would fly off the handlebars and die, so I stopped. I didn’t go down the hill.  More
Omega: Is emotional intelligence something we’re born with? Are there practices we can do to build our emotional intelligence? More
Omega recently hosted and participated in an important 3-day diversity training led by the Opening Doors Diversity Project. Participants from across New York’s Hudson Valley included representatives from Poughkeepsie Farm Project, Hudson River Housing, LGBTQ Task Force to Undo Racism,  More
bird flying in mountain landscape
We all want to be successful and we all struggle with what that means. Someone tells a young man running track that he’d be good at jumping hurdles. So he trains and finds himself in the blocks, nervous, wondering if this is right for him. When the gun goes off, he’s running as fast as he can to beat the others, to stay in his lane, to clear every hurdle. Legs burning, he pushes harder and strains to cross the finish line. Out of breath, hands on his knees, he wonders briefly, how did I get here? Is this where I need to be?  More
Sometimes our relationship with our parents is strong and loving, yet we still find ourselves unable to explain the difficult feelings we carry. We often assume that the problem originates inside us, and if we only dig deep enough, we’ll discover its source. Until we uncover the actual triggering event in our family history, we can relive fears and feelings that don’t belong to us—unconscious fragments of a trauma—and we will think they’re ours. Todd’s Story More
Omega Institute You Are Not the Wave by Sister Dang Nghiem
In the Buddhist tradition, there are three stages on the path of practice: Listening, Reflection, and Practice. The first stage, listening came from the historical setting of the Buddha’s time, when there was no radio, DVDs, or the Internet. The monks and nuns listened intently to the Buddha’s teachings, called dharma talks. The monastics who were listening were referred to as sravajas, which meant “listeners or hearers” of the Buddha’s teachings. Having listened, they reflected further, and they then practiced the teachings. More
Women of color are the most likely demographic to earn poverty wages because of conscious and unconscious social biases, personal confidence gaps, and an overall lack of opportunities. There is ample data focusing on the challenges women at large face in the workforce, but there is glaringly limited discussion about how it relates to challenges women of color face. Awareness of these factors on all sides is crucial in creating change. More