Learning paths content lists

Traditionally, we all like to plan our life. And of course we have to. It would become very chaotic if we just showed up for a plane or train without a ticket. But when we’re dealing with emotions and fear, deciding ahead of time how it’s all going to be doesn’t work. Our motto needs to be: “Learn as you go.” Each time you dare to remain where you are and do something completely fresh, unconventional, and nonhabitual, you open up new pathways in the brain. —Pema Chödrön More
Omega Institute A Shamanic Experience at the DMV
Contemporary shamanic teacher and practitioner Pat Heavren had recently taught a Munay-Ki workshop at Omega when she found herself at her local Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). Munay-Ki are rites of initiation, or energetic transmissions, from the medicine people of the Americas. The shamanic practice is a 9-step process to heal childhood and ancestral wounds. More
People connect to spirit in different ways. Some sit on a meditation cushion and seek stillness, while others move wildly and let their arms shake and feet stomp. More
Omega: The story you've told is that in 1980 you were using traditional hypnotherapy to take a patient back to the roots of her phobias. Instead of going back to her childhood, she went back 4,000 years to a different lifetime. How skeptical were you at that moment, and what helped you open up to the idea of past lives?   More
Omega Institute Yoga & Breast Cancer: What the Research Shows
Breast cancer patients and survivors have been practicing yoga as a form of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) for years. Recent research suggests that yoga can improve their lives both during and after treatment. More
When you picture a kirtan enthusiast in your mind’s eye, do you think of a retired American sniper who did three tours in Iraq? What about a former female sergeant who’s struggling with lung injuries, rage, and post-traumatic stress?  Some veterans are discovering that kirtan—a call-and-response form of mantra chanting that originated in India—is helping them cope with conditions such as PTSD and re-entry into civilian life. More
Omega Institute Glimpsing Eternity by Mark Nepo
Being deaf, Beethoven could hear the music of the universe, unheard by the rest of us. The String Quartet No. 14 in C# minor, Opus 131, played without pause, seems to gather the slow and steady rise of the sun, mixing it with the unyielding turn of the Earth around the fire in its center. He somehow weaves the discord of all the roots on Earth gripping further in the ground with the harmony of the winds that swirl through the mountains and over the oceans. More
It’s 8:55 a.m. and the subway from Brooklyn into Manhattan is paused on the bridge. I’m late for yoga class, a not so unfamiliar feeling, but this morning I don’t want to be late. I’m attending class with a teacher I’ve “known” for years, thanks to his instructional yoga videos. More
Omega Institute Pause and Absorb by Colleen Saidman
In 2006, Rodney and I had the privilege of taking a few classes with B.K.S. Iyengar. When it came time for headstand, I informed the yoga master that I didn’t do them—I have a seizure disorder, and I always felt it was aggravated by headstands. He told me, in no uncertain terms, to stand on my head now! And I did. I stayed up, and only came down when he said it was time. More
On Being a Medical Intuitive When I was a kid, I would do readings on houses. When we were driving around I would say to my mom, “You know what that house looks like inside? The people in there are happy, and the people in that house are not happy.” More