Body, Mind & Spirit | Page 11 | Omega

Learning Paths

Core Staff Jobs

Rhinebeck, New York

Core Staff: Core Staff live off campus and support Omega in a variety of managerial and administrative positions. These are year-round, salaried jobs with a full benefits package, including health and dental insurance.

Temporary and Hourly Staff: Temporary and hourly staff live off campus and support Omega in a variety of administrative tasks for an hourly wage. These positions do not include benefits.

Learning paths content lists

shamanic drum
A Contemporary Shamanic Approach to Healing
Today our minds, our emotions, our relationships, and our bodies are out of kilter. We know it, but we tend to ignore it until something goes very wrong—a scary diagnosis, a broken relationship, the death of a loved one, or simply an inability to function harmoniously in everyday life. When things are a little bad, we read a self-help book or go to a workshop. When they're really bad, we bring in experts to fix the problem—oncologists to address cancer, neurologists to repair the brain, psychologists to help us find peace and understand our family of origin. More
Isabel Allende on stage with microphone
An Interview With Isabel Allende
Omega: What do you think of the growing popularity and commercialization of feminism in pop culture? Isabel: It’s fine. Make condoms that say “feminist.” As long as it’s out there. It can take any shape or form or language—just bring it up. More
Omega Institute Mindfulness as a Healing Practice: An Interview With Sister Dang Nghiem
An Interview With Sister Dang Nghiem
Omega: Why is mindfulness so important for our times? Sister D: When I was in my second year of medical school, I had to make the decision whether to do a four-year program or a five-year program. I was stressing out about it, and in a dream I saw a lot of people on bicycles just plunging down a hill. I stopped at the top of the hill and recognized that there was a little girl sitting on my handlebars. I realized that if I were to plunge down the hill, that girl would fly off the handlebars and die, so I stopped. I didn’t go down the hill.  More
An Interview With Daniel Goleman and Tara Bennett-Goleman
Omega: Is emotional intelligence something we’re born with? Are there practices we can do to build our emotional intelligence? More
Omega recently hosted and participated in an important 3-day diversity training led by the Opening Doors Diversity Project. Participants from across New York’s Hudson Valley included representatives from Poughkeepsie Farm Project, Hudson River Housing, LGBTQ Task Force to Undo Racism,  More
bird flying in mountain landscape
We all want to be successful and we all struggle with what that means. Someone tells a young man running track that he’d be good at jumping hurdles. So he trains and finds himself in the blocks, nervous, wondering if this is right for him. When the gun goes off, he’s running as fast as he can to beat the others, to stay in his lane, to clear every hurdle. Legs burning, he pushes harder and strains to cross the finish line. Out of breath, hands on his knees, he wonders briefly, how did I get here? Is this where I need to be?  More
Have I mentioned that I've been trying to figure out the Internet? I was aware that when you click on something, something new appears on the screen. I knew if you post a naked picture to Facebook they kick you out for a while. More
Explore this month’s astrology and its celestial influence in your life with Eric Francis. Aries (March 20-April 19) More
footprints in the sand
Sometimes our relationship with our parents is strong and loving, yet we still find ourselves unable to explain the difficult feelings we carry. We often assume that the problem originates inside us, and if we only dig deep enough, we’ll discover its source. Until we uncover the actual triggering event in our family history, we can relive fears and feelings that don’t belong to us—unconscious fragments of a trauma—and we will think they’re ours. Todd’s Story More
Omega Institute You Are Not the Wave by Sister Dang Nghiem
In the Buddhist tradition, there are three stages on the path of practice: Listening, Reflection, and Practice. The first stage, listening came from the historical setting of the Buddha’s time, when there was no radio, DVDs, or the Internet. The monks and nuns listened intently to the Buddha’s teachings, called dharma talks. The monastics who were listening were referred to as sravajas, which meant “listeners or hearers” of the Buddha’s teachings. Having listened, they reflected further, and they then practiced the teachings. More