Learning paths content lists

For the entire Labor Day weekend, a spiritual bliss covers Omega's campus as people sing and chant from dusk to dawn.  Omega cofounder Stephan Rechtschaffen shares why Ecstatic Chant has the communal power to elevate people to a place of positivity and presence. More
Counselor, public speaker and facilitator of her Presence Through Movement workshops, Kim Eng has developed a body of teachings aimed at the transformation of consciousness through the integration of spirit, mind, and body. She sees our “God-nature” as living in and through the human body and teaches others to do the same. In this clip, Eng discusses how accessing deep, present moment awareness can help us to find our true identity. More
Spiritual life counselor Iyanla Vanzant says that every relationship we have is a reflection of the relationship we are having with ourselves. She explains that, the better we become at being with ourselves, the better we are in relationships, and vice versa. More
Daniel Rechtschaffen, MA, a pioneer in the field of mindfulness and education, is the creator of Mindful Children, an organization that leads trainings and implements mindfulness-based curriculum in collaboration with schools and organizations. In this video, he demonstrates how to practice heartfulness at every age and why it will help you stay connected to what you are feeling inside your heart. More
Thich Nhat Hanh is one of the most respected and recognized Zen masters in the world, as well as being a renowned poet, peace activist, and human rights advocate. Born in Vietnam, and serving as a Buddhist monk since the age of 16, he was one of the founders of the “engaged Buddhism” movement, choosing to lead a contemplative life while working outside the monastery, helping villagers suffering from the devastation of the Vietnam War. More
Yoga teacher Colleen Saidman, christened “The First Lady of Yoga” by the New York Times, discusses how her children have become teachers for her and her husband Rodney Yee. The family unit is an opportunity for revelation because of the unconditional love of parents for children, says the author of Yoga for Life: A Journey to Inner Peace and Freedom. Saidman is also a Jivamukti Yoga® teacher and co-founder of Urban Zen’s Integrative Yoga Therapist Program. More
What is your purpose? Spiritual teacher and yoga therapist, Beryl Bender Birch shares her thoughts on why service will provide you with the greatest sense of self worth and long-lasting happiness.   More
Yoga teacher, Rodney Yee says that you experience awakening when you open your body, then it is no longer a barrier to the world, but the place where you are able to absorb and listen to life all around you. More
Codirector of the Piedmont Yoga Studio, Rodney Yee explains how being fully embodied and present in every moment is the practice of bringing yoga into your life every day. More
A pioneer in the field of mindfulness and education, Daniel Rechtschaffen, MA, discusses meditation, the ancient science of breath, mind, heart and body. More
Omega: Is the process of waking up to your true nature a gradual one for most people or is it sudden and spontaneous? More
Three women in a garden
Game changer (noun): a person or idea that significantly affects the outcome of something Do Your Own Work & Own Your Part Sean Corn   There are many ways to become an effective game changer, but in the context of spiritual activism, committing to your inner work and transforming your own limited beliefs is primary. More
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Since we all spend so much time in our relationships, why not turn them into a yoga for getting free? Living a spiritual life is a strategy for working on yourself for the benefit of all beings. That’s another way of saying that the optimum thing you can do for someone else is to work on yourself—not out of some idealistic sense of altruism, but because getting to oneness for yourself means resolving your sense of separateness to where we’re all family. The reality is that love is a state of being that comes from within. —Ram Dass More
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More than four decades is a long time to be engaged in one activity. Have I managed to do meditation every day no matter what? No. Have I often experienced states of bliss that kept me going? No. Did my knees hurt? Yes. Did my shoulders ache? Yes. Was I sometimes filled with anger, aggression, tormented by old ragged memories? Yes. Did I burn with sexual desire, crave a hot fudge sundae so bad my teeth ached? Yes. Why did I do it? What kept me going? More
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We can use our body as a fortress or as a cathedral—protecting ourselves from the possibility of pain or danger, or opening ourselves to the beauty and wisdom in every cell. We’re taught to trivialize our bodily sensations because we’re afraid of suffering, eros, or narcissism. So we close ourselves off to our deepest yearnings, our desires for love and freedom, our hunger for expressing from the deepest parts of ourselves. More
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Among all the suppressed emotions Radical Remission survivors talk to me about releasing, fear is by far one of the most common discussed. Perhaps this is because fear is something we all have felt to some degree, whereas not everyone can relate to, for example, intensely held grief or resentment. The fear of death, in particular, is something we all must face at some point in our lives, and cancer patients are forced to face it the moment they hear the words, “You have cancer.” More
Many mainstream media ads for food and diet products normalize shame, guilt, bingeing, and purging. Eating has become divorced from hunger and nutrition in our culture. It’s difficult to find women, especially young women, who have really healthy attitudes toward food and their bodies. My own daughter has struggled with these issues. When she was a child, I did all the things I advise people to do. I talked with her very openly about body image, sex and sexuality, media literacy—everything! I created a safe place for her to ask me anything. She often attended my lectures. More
Omega: What do you mean when you say permaculture can be useful for changemakers? Abrah: Permaculture's regenerative design process can be used by anyone who is already anchored in a professional field. It is a framework to help people design and reimagine their personal lives, personal sustainability, approach to project management, and vision for the world. More
Omega: You have described your near-death experience as a “realm of clarity and expansiveness.” Can you tell us what it was like? Anita: I felt total clarity and a sense of awakening. It was as if everything I believed and bought into about myself disappeared. It didn't matter how many degrees I had, or what my race, religion, or cultural background were—it all disappeared. There was no need for labels. More