Learning Paths

Core Staff Jobs

Rhinebeck, New York

Core Staff: Core Staff live off campus and support Omega in a variety of managerial and administrative positions. These are year-round, salaried jobs with a full benefits package, including health and dental insurance.

Temporary and Hourly Staff: Temporary and hourly staff live off campus and support Omega in a variety of administrative tasks for an hourly wage. These positions do not include benefits.

Learning paths content lists

Men and women at work standing around whiteboard
Why Women Ask More Questions
When exploring the challenges men and women face in the workplace, men will often state that women ask too many questions. Some men even say it’s their top challenge, especially during meetings when they view women’s questions as slowing down progress or delaying decision-making. Women commonly agree that they do ask more questions than men, but that their questions are intended to create a collaborative environment, stimulate an exchange of ideas, discover what’s important, and arrive at a best possible outcome. More
A group of women together in a class picture
An Intensive Development Program
We have been dreaming about you for some time now. We are codreamers who have been wondering, "Who would accept our invitation to Become the Kind of Leaders the World Needs Now? Who would want to explore women's leadership and themselves along with us, and think together with us about how we might use our leadership for the collective good?" You are the leaders we have been imagining. Knowing that it is we, humans, who are the instruments of change—together in this Intensive we will work on the personhood of those instruments. More
Two young women at a table working
Ask for What You Need
One of the most important skills we learn as girls is the ability to ask without knowing the outcome: to apply for an opportunity we might not get, to raise our hand even if we don’t know the right answer, to ask for what we want even if the answer will surely be no. Yet when it comes to friendship problems, too many of us don’t say what we need because we worry we’ll hear the word no. Fear of getting rejected, or the fact that “things will never change” are the most common explanations girls and women share about refusing to speak up. More
Men and women on hilltop holding hands
It's time for men and boys to start acknowledging the role male domination and socialization plays in all forms of violence against women and girls. The Centers for Disease Control states that men's violence against women is the leading cause of injury to women in this country. That would lead me to say that men's violence against women is at epidemic levels and needs to be addressed as such.  More
Hear what former and current Seasonal Community Members have to say as they share their experiences and express how their seasonal community experience has changed their lives. Eliyahu Sills, musician and mentor More
Take Time to Convene & Reflect
The top managers of the Legal Aid Society's Juvenile Rights Practice only get to meet once a month, if that. "We needed time away from our hectic court-based environment to think more clearly, without interruption, and in a supportive environment," says Ann Marie Scalia, attorney-in-charge of the Manhattan Juvenile Rights office. Theirs is not a unique story. More
Omega Institute Measure Your Success By How Much Fun You're Having by Gabrielle Bernstein
For the past two years I’ve made the intention to measure my success with how much fun I’m having. I came to this intention after living in the opposite way and hitting bottom. For a while I was measuring my success based on my level of stress, but then I surrendered to the fact that true success must be based on happiness. More
Woman stands at the front of room presenting to group of people
6 Tips on Women's Leadership
1.     Anchor More
Resource Guide From 2013 OCSL Conference: Where We Go From Here
Where We Go From Here
Maya AzucenaFaculty website: mayaazucena.com Robert "Skip" BackusFaculty website: eOmega.org/OCSL More
Self-criticism, rumination, and thought suppression are frequently associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; Bennett & Wells, 2010), as is depression (Krupnick et al., 2008). There is evidence that self-compassion is negatively associated with self-criticism, rumination, thought suppression, anxiety, and depression, and positively associated with healthy psychological functioning, including life satisfaction and social connectedness (Neff, Rude, & Kirkpatrick, 2007). A small body of literature has assessed the role of self-compassion in PTSD.... More