Leadership & Work | Page 6 | Omega
Leadership & Work

Find a workshop

Courtney E. Martin, author, activist, and speaker, identifies the features of new generations of feminism in the U.S. today. More
Famed for her talent, creativity, and versatility as a singer, songwriter, and guitarist, this Grammy Award-winning artist has used her music as a way to convey powerful, personal messages. Here she explains why she believes feminism is truly for every one of us, how we need to promote it to a younger generation, and why she is more convinced than ever that it will save the world. More
Elizabeth Lesser, cofounder of Omega Institute and the Omega Women’s Leadership Center (OWLC), describes the developmental arc of dependence, independence, to interdependence for boys and girls. More
Zainab Salbi, international author, activist, and journalist speaks to the importance of taking care of yourself and remembering to dance in the midst of your activism work. More
Oscar Award-winning actress and social change activist, Jane Fonda, describes her work to face her eating disorder and heal her feminine self. More
Oscar Award-winning actress and social change activist, Jane Fonda reminds us of how toxic patriarchy is to men and boys, blocking their heads from their hearts in the attempts to be "real men". More
Elizabeth Lesser, cofounder of Omega Institute and the Omega Women’s Leadership Center (OWLC), speaks about values that are perceived as traditionally feminine and how to bring them forward into today’s world. More
Kimberle Crenshaw, professor of law at UCLA and Columbia and an authority on Critical Race Theory and Civil Rights, explains why and how feminism must match its politics to a full spectrum reality of all lives. More
Kimberle Crenshaw, professor of law at UCLA and Columbia and an authority in Critical Race Theory and Civil Rights, describes a new kind of feminism that can hold all facets of lived experience. More
Kimberle Crenshaw, professor of law at UCLA and Columbia and an authority on Critical Race Theory and Civil Rights, asks what happens when feminists overlook other forms of discrimination and oppression. More

Pages

Ai-jen Poo
What’s Possible: An Interview With Ai-jen Poo
Marianne: When you hear the term power, what does it bring up in you? How do you define power? Ai-jen: We talk a lot about the importance of organizing, especially among women, because we believe that we need to build power to change the world and win for women everywhere—particularly low income women. When I hear the term power, what it brings up is what it takes to win meaningful change in people's lives at scale, and that's the kind of power that we're interested in building. More
An Interview With Michael J. Gelb
Omega: What is your definition of a personal or professional Renaissance? Michael: We are all born with the capacity for genius. Every healthy child displays boundless energy, wild imagination, and delightful creativity. But then we go to school and get de-geniused. Renaissance means “rebirth.” I’m devoted to helping my students experience a rebirth or Renaissance of their original energy, imagination, and creativity.  More
An Interview With angel Kyodo williams
Omega: How do you see self-care as a particularly radical act of freedom and healing? How can meeting our individual needs bring us closer to being able to meet the needs of the many? More
Omega Institute Women's Leadership in the Middle East: An Interview With Nadia Al-Sakkaf
An Interview With Nadia Al-Sakkaf
Omega: You’ve noted that Yemen is a “young” country—most of the population is under 15 years old. Right now is a pivotal time for the future of the nation, as change accelerates in a short time. How has it felt to step into that history politically as one of the only women in a position of political authority?  More
Manisha Thakor
An Interview With Manisha Thakor
Omega: You spent 15 years working as an analyst, portfolio manager, and client relations executive. How did that experience inspire you to rethink financial health and investment? More
An Interview With Jamia Wilson
Omega: Many people see the United States as increasingly politically divided. Some blame the media for inciting or perpetuating misunderstanding and bad will. In a climate so easy to “otherize” for the sake of ratings and clicks, how do you think media can foster alternative conversation and how do you personally handle political disagreements? More
What’s Possible: An Interview With Cecile Richards
Marianne: Women are slowly achieving more leadership positions in many sectors, but we are still far from parity. For example, though we made strides in this last election, women still make up only 18% of Congress. What obstacles do you think keep women from entering and advancing through the pipeline, and what do you think we can do to change that? Do you think we just don't see ourselves there, or is it because there are structural obstacles?  More
Life coaching is one of the fastest-growing industries in the world. More than 47,000 professional coaches now work worldwide, according to The International Coach Federation. More
What's Possible: An Interview With Anna Deavere Smith
Marianne: The Omega Women's Leadership Center (OWLC) is focused on encouraging more women in leadership and also helping create a new paradigm of power. How do you define power? What does power mean to you? More
What's Possible: An Interview with Dr. Christiane Northrup
Marianne: Your philosophy toward women’s health and wellness is very synergistic to the Omega Women’s Leadership Center’s approach to leadership, in terms of learning to tune into our inner wisdom. How would you, personally, define power? What does power mean to you? More

Pages