Learning Paths

Core Staff Jobs

Rhinebeck, New York

Core Staff: Core Staff live off campus and support Omega in a variety of managerial and administrative positions. These are year-round, salaried jobs with a full benefits package, including health and dental insurance.

Temporary and Hourly Staff: Temporary and hourly staff live off campus and support Omega in a variety of administrative tasks for an hourly wage. These positions do not include benefits.

Learning paths content lists

An Interview With Tony Porter
Omega: What exactly is the “man box” and how does it serve, as well as limit, a person's masculinity?  Tony: The “man box” is how men have been collectively socialized to understand what it means to be a man. It doesn’t mean that all men respond in the same way to this collective socialization but it does mean that all men have an understanding of this socialization. "Teaching our boys to recognize fear and emotional pain can have a tremendously positive impact on their development from boys to men." —Tony Porter  More
What’s Possible: An Interview With Ai-jen Poo
Marianne: When you hear the term power, what does it bring up in you? How do you define it? Ai-jen: We talk a lot about the importance of organizing, especially among women, because we believe that we need to build power to change the world and win for women everywhere—particularly low-income women. When I hear the term power, what it brings up is what it takes to win meaningful change in people's lives at scale, and that's the kind of power that we're interested in building. More
Eve Ensler
What’s Possible: An Interview With Eve Ensler
Marianne: You have been a part of Omega’s Women & Power gatherings since the very beginning. What was your experience of the “What’s Possible” gathering? Eve: There was a tremendous sense of unity. It felt like speakers and participants were equally engaged and equally empowered. I was moved by the kind of energetic hunger and clarity in women—this need to go further and do more and be bolder. There just seemed like a lot less fear in general and a lot more willingness to be disruptive and daring. More
An Interview With angel Kyodo williams
Omega: How do you see self-care as a particularly radical act of freedom and healing? How can meeting our individual needs bring us closer to being able to meet the needs of the many? More
An Interview With Jamia Wilson
Omega: Many people see the United States as increasingly politically divided. Some blame the media for inciting or perpetuating misunderstanding and bad will. In a climate so easy to “otherize” for the sake of ratings and clicks, how do you think media can foster alternative conversation and how do you personally handle political disagreements? More
What’s Possible: An Interview With Cecile Richards
Marianne: Women are slowly achieving more leadership positions in many sectors, but we are still far from parity. For example, though we made strides in this last election, women still make up only 18% of Congress. What obstacles do you think keep women from entering and advancing through the pipeline, and what do you think we can do to change that? Do you think we just don't see ourselves there, or is it because there are structural obstacles?  More
What's Possible: An Interview with Dr. Christiane Northrup
Marianne: Your philosophy toward women’s health and wellness is very synergistic to the Omega Women’s Leadership Center’s approach to leadership, in terms of tuning into our inner wisdom. How would you, personally, define power? What does power mean to you? More
What's Possible: An Interview With Elizabeth Lesser
Marianne: What inspired the formation of the Omega Women’s Leadership Center? More
Stephanie Coontz
An Interview With Stephanie Coontz
Omega: You say marriage has changed more in the past 30 years than in the past 3,000 years and that the very traits that make marriage in our contemporary society more rewarding have also made it less stable. How so? More
woman looking at camera
This is what the great choice comes down to—the great conflict between first-hand experience and tradition, between spontaneity and decorum, between compassion and obligation. Other life forms have no part in this. It’s strictly a human affair. The sapling doesn’t look to its elders for approval. It just grows toward the light. The bee feels its hunger and finds its honey. It doesn’t embark out of any sense of duty. When I speak of these things, distrustful minds, against all intention of getting involved, blurt out but we have to live in the real world. More