Learning paths content lists

1. Connect: Checking in With My Feelings Take a quiet moment for yourself to investigate how you are feeling. Sit in a way that is steady and comfortable. Choose whether to put your hands in your lap, by your sides, or place a hand on your heart or your belly—whatever feels right to you. Focus on taking a few slow and steady breaths, and then ask yourself what emotions you are feeling right now. More
Omega: Can you talk about the different types of qigong and how someone new to the practice might find the right one for them? More
Man receiving acupuncture
The ancient Greek word for wound is trauma. Simply defined, trauma is a deeply disturbing experience that can create extreme stress and overwhelm the body and the mind.  About 70 percent of U.S. adults have experienced a traumatic event at least once in their lives and up to 20 percent of these people can also develop post-traumatic stress, according to the nonprofit organization Sidran Traumatic Stress Institute. More
Drew, who served in the U.S. Army in Iraq in both 2007 and 2008, came to Omega to help heal both his mind and his body. Dealing with a brain injury and post-traumatic stress, he was looking for a holistic way to reset his nervous system. He says returning to civilian life was much harder than his service, and he was not prepared for the difficult transition. “You get caught up and lost, and then you have friends taking their own life,” he said. “I needed somewhere to reset.” More
older woman doing yoga
Omega: Having studied extensively with both B.K.S. Iyengar and his daughter Geeta Iyengar, what have you observed about the role of women in yoga? Joan: One of Mr. Iyengar’s legacies—we call him Guruji—is that he was the first one that taught men and women in the same class. It had been forbidden, but he broke through a lot of Indian taboos in his introduction of yoga to the West, and now everybody can do yoga if they want to. More
Thousands of people have overcome cancer against incredible odds, and Kelly Turner has made a career out of studying these cases—1,500 of them and counting. She calls it radical remission, or people who have experienced a complete reversal of a serious or terminal cancer diagnosis. More
Omega: When you first started teaching, you've said you were afraid to speak from your heart. How did that change for you? Elena: That fear resulted from the fact that I wasn’t being honest about the life I was leading. I was teaching yoga, and breathing, and sitting, and wasn’t always practicing. It was painful to teach the work so well and not be practicing myself.  Omega: Why do you think so many people hide their true selves? More
Omega: How did you become an entrepreneur? Bizzie: If I look back at my childhood, I grew up with an “it’s okay to be a boss” mentality. My dad really instilled that in me since I was very young. I can remember being a child and ordering at a restaurant. At four or five, I would have to order for myself and use my manners. My dad always helped me put communication at the forefront of everything that I did. More
Childhood, especially ages 2-10, is a time of exploration, experimentation, and curiosity. It’s a natural period of learning when children attempt to make meaning of their outer and inner worlds. Yoga can help children harness the enthusiasm and natural curiosity of this time to befriend their body and mind, develop a sense of agency and competence, and self-regulate and manage their emotions. More
Adolescence is a time of tremendous change for children physically and can be particularly intense emotionally. It is also a time when they are deeply engaged in self-discovery and exploring the inner workings and capacities of their identity. More