Learning paths content lists

Rodney Yee yoga focuses mainly on the Iyengar style, but in recent years Yee has come to rely on his own practice and intuition to influence his teaching. Rodney Yee yoga also focuses on bringing philosophy into action and, he says, on unveiling the natural beauty of our spirits. Rodney Yee yoga helps cleanse the mind and body, which allows for the presence of being. More
Yoga teacher Colleen Saidman, christened “The First Lady of Yoga” by the New York Times, discusses how her children have become teachers for her and her husband Rodney Yee. The family unit is an opportunity for revelation because of the unconditional love of parents for children, says the author of Yoga for Life: A Journey to Inner Peace and Freedom. Saidman is also a Jivamukti Yoga® teacher and co-founder of Urban Zen’s Integrative Yoga Therapist Program. More
kids doing yoga outside
According to the Yoga Service Council, yoga service is defined as the intentional sharing of yoga practices that support healing and build resilience for all—regardless of circumstances—and are taught within a context of conscious relationship and rooted in self-reflection and self-inquiry. More
Woman holding hips in yoga studio
Omega: What was your entry into yoga and how has it impacted your life? Tamara: I remember being little and watching Lilias Folan on television. She was my first intro to yoga and I was fascinated by her long braid of hair, but of course I wasn’t practicing back then. In the 1980s, I was exploring off and on, practicing at home. I bought a few books and that eventually led to me to sign up for a teacher training. More
When adapted to meet the needs, concerns, and values of military personnel and veterans, yoga can be an exceptional resource for rebuilding the capacity to maintain emotional equilibrium. Help Students to Find Their Edge Encourage veterans to “find their edge” safely by balancing force and ease. More
1. Connect: Checking in With My Feelings Take a quiet moment for yourself to investigate how you are feeling. Sit in a way that is steady and comfortable. Choose whether to put your hands in your lap, by your sides, or place a hand on your heart or your belly—whatever feels right to you. Focus on taking a few slow and steady breaths, and then ask yourself what emotions you are feeling right now. More
Omega: Can you talk about the different types of qigong and how someone new to the practice might find the right one for them? More
Man receiving acupuncture
The ancient Greek word for wound is trauma. Simply defined, trauma is a deeply disturbing experience that can create extreme stress and overwhelm the body and the mind.  About 70 percent of U.S. adults have experienced a traumatic event at least once in their lives and up to 20 percent of these people can also develop post-traumatic stress, according to the nonprofit organization Sidran Traumatic Stress Institute. More
Drew, who served in the U.S. Army in Iraq in both 2007 and 2008, came to Omega to help heal both his mind and his body. Dealing with a brain injury and post-traumatic stress, he was looking for a holistic way to reset his nervous system. He says returning to civilian life was much harder than his service, and he was not prepared for the difficult transition. “You get caught up and lost, and then you have friends taking their own life,” he said. “I needed somewhere to reset.” More
older woman doing yoga
Omega: Having studied extensively with both B.K.S. Iyengar and his daughter Geeta Iyengar, what have you observed about the role of women in yoga? Joan: One of Mr. Iyengar’s legacies—we call him Guruji—is that he was the first one that taught men and women in the same class. It had been forbidden, but he broke through a lot of Indian taboos in his introduction of yoga to the West, and now everybody can do yoga if they want to. More
Thousands of people have overcome cancer against incredible odds, and Kelly Turner has made a career out of studying these cases—1,500 of them and counting. She calls it radical remission, or people who have experienced a complete reversal of a serious or terminal cancer diagnosis. More
Omega: When you first started teaching, you've said you were afraid to speak from your heart. How did that change for you? Elena: That fear resulted from the fact that I wasn’t being honest about the life I was leading. I was teaching yoga, and breathing, and sitting, and wasn’t always practicing. It was painful to teach the work so well and not be practicing myself.  Omega: Why do you think so many people hide their true selves? More