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Joan Halifax Roshi, Zen Buddhist priest, author, and founder of the Ojai Foundation and Upaya Zen Center, describes the three "transparencies" of socially engaged, full-hearted Buddhism.

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angel Kyodo williams, author, activist, and master trainer, offers an exercise to remind us and root us in what matters most.

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A Union of Ideals

By the grace of many Eastern traditions, teachers, and ancestors, white Western dharma communities have at their disposal profoundly liberating teachings and practices that have the power to...

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In a society where doingness is more encouraged and awarded than beingness, it can be challenging to grasp that in “inaction” there is a great deal of “action” taking place. The slogan of the restless mind is: “Don’t just sit there; do something...

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About three decades ago I spent a year as a Buddhist monk in Thailand. It was a very austere life, dedicated to meditation and simplicity. One of the trainings I practiced was to only take one meal a day from the food collected...

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Omega: Why is mindfulness so important for our times?

Sister D: When I was in my second year of medical school, I had to make the decision whether to do a four-year program or a five-year program. I was...

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In the Buddhist tradition, there are three stages on the path of practice: Listening, Reflection, and Practice. The first stage, listening came from the historical setting of the Buddha’s time, when there was no radio, DVDs, or the Internet. The...

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In the Buddhist tradition, there are three sublime practices:

The first sublime practice is the generation of a compassionate and loving heart, also known as pure intention. We begin each activity with the positive intention that our...

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Omega: What instrument would you still like to learn how to play?

Jimmie: I would love to play the piano. I always regret that I didn’t learn the piano. I also would like to play the electric guitar....