Learning paths content lists

Elizabeth Lesser, cofounder of Omega Institute and the Omega Women's Leadership Center, demonstrates a simple but powerful meditation to remind you to do no harm and take nothing from people who are meaning ill to you. "Both can happen at the same time. We can be peaceful warriors," says Elizabeth.  More
American spiritual teacher Adyashanti defines two types of awareness—focused awareness and the field of awareness—and says we all have experienced both.  More
When we label something, does it change the thing itself, or just how we perceive it? Pema Chödrön, one of the most prominent Buddhist teachers in the West today, gives an example of how our minds alter our experiences. More
angel Kyodo williams, author, activist, and master trainer, offers an exercise to remind us and root us in what matters most. More
Sister Joan Chittister, the iconic spiritual feminist and activist, asks us to consider spirituality as a call to action in our culture. More
Tara Brach, meditation teacher and author of Radical Acceptance and True Refuge, describes the process of moving through pain and fear into unconditional love and acceptance. More
Joan Halifax Roshi, Zen Buddhist priest, author, and founder of the Ojai Foundation and Upaya Zen Center, describes the three "transparencies" of socially engaged, full-hearted Buddhism. More
Esther Armah, award-winning journalist, playwright, and radio host, recalls her Ghanian childhood and defines a process of "intimate revolution" to transform personal and collective trauma. More
Activist, youth educator and cofounder of A Call to Men, Tony Porter describes the fears that hold men back and expresses his optimism for a future of equity and social justice. More
Gloria Steinem, writer, activist, and women’s rights movement leader, explains how race is a divisive social construct and reminds us of our shared evolution and humanity. More
What if we thought of judgment as another form of intuition? From the perspective of ego, judgments are the criticisms that divide our hearts from those that seem foreign to our known perceptions of reality. While the soul is naturally welcoming of the very changes that ego fights at every turn, the soul still has a journey of profound growth. One such lesson is recognizing the appearance of any judgment as an intuition being received. More
Omega: How has yoga become a tool to help trauma survivors?  More
Omega: Why are you speaking about spirituality and activism now? Skip: Because we are at a critical junction point and there is a sense of cultural awareness happening now that we can take advantage of. More
The Four Agreements are simple: Be impeccable with your word. Don’t take anything personally. Don’t make assumptions. Always do your best. But living the Four Agreements can be challenging. That’s why sisters Linda and Angelina Pelano came to Omega on a scholarship in June 2017 to attend the Four Agreements workshop led by don Miguel Ruiz and his sons, don Miguel Ruiz Jr. and don Jose Ruiz. More
Omega: Can you give a simple definition of nondual spirituality? Sharon: The simplest way to describe it is the direct way of turning the attention back onto itself, of coming back to who you are. The classic definition is “you are what you’re looking for.” More
Omega Institute and the Yoga Service Council have worked together since 2014 to produce a series of Yoga Service Best Practices Guides, including Best Practices for Yoga in Schools (2015) and Yoga With Veterans (2016), and most recently Best Practices for Yoga in the Criminal Justice System (2017). More
1. Keep a Journal More
1. 10 Questions for the Dalai Lama (2006) Genre: Documentary Summary: Tackling some of the fundamental questions of our time with footage and observations from trips throughout India and the Middle East, this movie features the wisdom of one of the most well-known spiritual leaders. More
Yoga has much to offer people in the criminal justice system, including those who are incarcerated or otherwise system-involved as well as those who work as correctional officers, administrators, or other criminal justice professionals. More
Not everyone knows what they want to be when they grow up, but at 8, Kasha Dziewisz knew. She wanted to be a fashion designer and artist. Color, form, and art captured her attention and youthful imagination. “Color has been the backbone of all I do. It’s a motivator for me and makes me feel happy. Even around the house, I always like to have fresh flowers. Sometimes I’ll arrange a bowl of fruit next to it and then end up drawing or painting it,” says Kasha. More