Learning paths content lists

Want to stop the insanity of trying to be some “other” version of yourself, or who you think other people want you to be? Ready for some self-acceptance? Panache Desai says you need to start living your life from the inside out. More
For many of us, self-acceptance is tough. But Panache Desai asks you to go beyond what is “normal” and just be who you are. More
Elizabeth Lesser, cofounder of Omega Institute and the Omega Women’s Leadership Center (OWLC), celebrates the "guts" it takes to be an empathetic human being. More
Zainab Salbi, international author, activist, and journalist speaks to the importance of taking care of yourself and remembering to dance in the midst of your activism work. More
Oscar Award-winning actress and social change activist, Jane Fonda reminds us of how toxic patriarchy is to men and boys, blocking their heads from their hearts in the attempts to be "real men". More
The writer, activist, and leader in the women’s rights movement, Gloria Steinem, shares insight into the historic roots of feminism right under our feet. More
Oscar Award-winning actress and social change activist Jane Fonda talks to Eve Ensler about the importance of raising young boys to be emotionally engaged men in our culture. More
Sister Joan Chittister is one of the most articulate social analysts and influential religious leaders of our time, presenting with the Dalai Lama and working with the UN. In this excerpt she speaks to religion, war, and women’s place in spirituality and creating a tomorrow in which we express values that are sound in ethics, empathy, morality, and love. More
Elizabeth Lesser, cofounder of Omega Institute and the Omega Women’s Leadership Center (OWLC), describes the developmental arc of dependence, independence, to interdependence for boys and girls. More
Oscar Award-winning actress and social change activist, Jane Fonda, describes her work to face her eating disorder and heal her feminine self. More
Omega: How can the second agreement, “Don’t take anything personally,” be useful for us when it comes to family members and friends? don Miguel Jr.: My father taught me that I’m responsible to the tips of my own fingers; I’m not responsible to anyone else. To take things personally is to assume responsibility for someone else’s will. Here’s a story of how my father taught it to me: More
Pile of tarot cards
Last night I watched the first episode of the new season of the world’s longest-running television drama, Dr. Who. The show is a light-hearted time travel story that, over its 55 years, has become more complex, more mysterious, and more rooted in the wonders of life, death, and identity. Afterward, I thought about the Tarot—what it has meant to me, what it gives us—and it struck me that Dr. Who and his strange time machine, the Tardis, have a lot in common with the Tarot and those of us who read the cards. More
Man standing in field smiling
A miracle is a shift in thinking, a shift from fear to love. At first glance that sounds a bit ridiculous. How does shifting a thought cause a miraculous change? And yet it does that exactly. For every thought we think creates form on some level. A simple thought—seemingly trivial or even unimportant—carries within it the power to move mountains. And that is the least it can do. There is no worldly power—no money, no technology, no business or government—that can match in power the power we wield by simply using our minds for the purposes of love. More
woman lifting up happy baby
Hope has a bad name these days among certain teachers. On the one hand, it seems to suggest wishful thinking that distracts us from a sober assessment of reality and fosters unrealistic expectations. As Nietzsche put it, “Hope is the worst of evils, for it prolongs the torments of man.” Meanwhile, in the language of “spirituality,” hope implies a rejection of the present moment, or perhaps a taint of doubt eroding the creative power of one’s intentions. But let us not be so quick to dismiss this primal element of the human psyche. More
kids doing yoga outside
According to the Yoga Service Council, yoga service is defined as the intentional sharing of yoga practices that support healing and build resilience for all—regardless of circumstances—and are taught within a context of conscious relationship and rooted in self-reflection and self-inquiry. More
When we get hooked on the latest video game on our phone, or our favorite flavor of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, we are tapping into one of the most evolutionarily conserved learning processes currently known to science, one shared among countless species and dating back to the most basic nervous systems known to man. This reward-based learning process basically goes like this: We see some food that looks good. Our brain says, Calories, survival! And we eat the food. More
Woman holding hips in yoga studio
Omega: What was your entry into yoga and how has it impacted your life? Tamara: I remember being little and watching Lilias Folan on television. She was my first intro to yoga and I was fascinated by her long braid of hair, but of course I wasn’t practicing back then. In the 1980s, I was exploring off and on, practicing at home. I bought a few books and that eventually led to me to sign up for a teacher training. More
Person typing on computer near phone
Is paying attention becoming a thing of the past? We relinquish it at our own peril. Think about it. Kitchen sensors can notify us when the milk in our refrigerator has reached its sell-by date and needs replacing. But is it worth sacrificing our sensory awareness? If we no longer read the expiration date, sniff or taste the product, or shake it to hear or feel lumps that may have formed, our powers of observation are diminished. More
Budgeting. There, I said it. How did that word make you feel? If you are like most people you found yourself tensing up and feeling resistance. What if I told you there was another way to manage your cash flow, one that works with (not against) the flow of the universe. Would you be interested in learning more? More
A Union of Ideals More