| Page 27 | Omega

Learning paths content lists

ball of light between two hands
Chi—also known as prana, the warm current, Kundalini power, or the electromagnetic life force—is very difficult to describe because this life energy is invisible and cannot be seen. However, we can feel it. "Chi" [also spelled qi or ki] is simply the Chinese word for "breath." On the physical level, it is the raw air we breathe in and out, revitalizing us and keeping us alive. Our life hangs by this thin thread of breath every second of our lives, and that thread is seemingly empty air. More
Omega Institute Did You Play Today?
"We do not quit playing because we grow old; we grow old because we quit playing." While it's unclear exactly who coined this phrase, it's a sentiment worth taking to heart. Play is an essential part of life. But what exactly is it? Like art, we know it when we see and experience it. More
Since speaking at the first Yoga Service Conference (in 2012), Chelsea Roff has raised more than $100,000 to start her own nonprofit Eat Breathe Thrive™. Her organization works to help individuals prevent and fully recover from disordered eating and negative body image through evidence-based programs that integrate yoga, community, and service. More
Most people do not live in a cloistered monastery in the middle of nowhere, free to practice awareness in solitude. They, like you, live in a community—where the people they love and the noise of the world attempt to hook their attention in every possible way. Even those who do live in an ashram or a monastery, a space created almost exclusively for practicing awareness, will tell you that their world is far from being distraction-free. So, regardless of where you are, coming into and out of awareness is a universal human condition. More
Omega: Your book Big Magic is about the creative process. “Stubborn” is a word you evoke to describe your writing practice. But you also “ascend toward stubborn gladness” as a way of being joyful and loving.  What is the relationship between discipline and playfulness? More
Omega: You have a very disciplined approach to your writing, but your meditation practice has ebbed and flowed. What is the growing edge in your spiritual practice?  Elizabeth: I keep trying. I really do. I kind of feel like the smoker who has quit 90 times, but I have optimism that one of these days I'm going to get it. More
Omega: Women in the 21st century are forging new paths while being held to impossible “women's magazine” standards—“perfection” and “balance” are words you encourage women not to use. The Signature of All Things tells the 19th century life story of a rare, intrepid woman scientist. Do you consider yourself political in your writing? More
Omega: You once said, “What you do when everything goes right doesn’t tell me who you are. It’s what you do after disaster that shows your character most.” How do you define this boldness in your own life? More
Omega: When you think about the women you interviewed for your book How Great Women Lead, written with your daughter Darcy Deane, do you see any one trait, characteristic, or belief they all have in common? More
Omega: What motivated you to begin meditating? Tara: There were two reasons. First, I had the sense I needed to improve myself. I thought meditation would diminish the parts of me I didn’t like and I'd become a more perfect and awake person. I don't know where I got that idea, but I worked really hard at it. I would go to different teachers and they would say, "Just relax, it's okay," but I would then take that on as the next way to improve myself. More