| Page 6 | Omega

Learning paths content lists

Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela, psychologist and senior research professor in South Africa served on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. She describes the relationship between forgiveness and transformation. More
Zainab Salbi, international author, activist, and journalist, tells the story of bringing forth her deepest secret and relinquishing her shame. More
Riane Eisler, an eminent social scientist and activist, attorney, and author, explains how her mother exemplified spiritual courage, the courage to stand up to injustice out of love. More
Sarah Peter is an artist, philanthropist and cofounder of the Omega Women’s Leadership Center. She describes here the internal work of achieving peace. More
angel Kyodo williams, the author, activist, and master trainer, describes the internal path to compassion and interdependence. More
Betty Williams, co-recipient of the 1976 Nobel Peace Prize for her work in Ireland and the head of the Global Children's Foundation tells a story about humor and her work with the Dalai Lama. More
Loung Ung, author and human rights activist, and Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela, South African psychologist and senior professor, discuss remorse, empathy, and healing their experiences of the Khmer Rouge and Apartheid. More
Meditation teacher, Sharon Salzberg, explains how lovingkindness creates happiness and inspires change. "It doesn't have to be a dog-eat-dog world. If we look at a time that we've received someone's kindness, or we were kind in return, that's when we're actually happy," Sharon says. "And that happiness becomes the fuel for effective action in the world." More
Elizabeth Lesser, cofounder of Omega Institute and the Omega Women's Leadership Center, demonstrates a simple but powerful meditation to remind you to do no harm and take nothing from people who are meaning ill to you. "Both can happen at the same time. We can be peaceful warriors," says Elizabeth.  More
American spiritual teacher Adyashanti defines two types of awareness—focused awareness and the field of awareness—and says we all have experienced both.  More
It’s so much easier to follow the path of the heart than to try to follow the path of the knowing mind. Through the doorway of the personal heart, you can enter what I like to call the Heart of Vastness, or the Big Heart of infinite connection. Later, of course, you can bring the mind back, and it can be very useful. So long as it’s not in the driver’s seat, the mind can be a brilliant vehicle of creative intelligence, rather than serving as the voice of your dominating will. Then expression becomes poetry. Or, better yet, comedy! More
Each of us has a divine destiny. We are constantly moving and evolving into this destiny. At times, our progress may be waylaid by life’s detours. But these side trips through bad marriages, dead-end jobs, financial shortfalls, health challenges, and the myriad of other possible hardships are not reasons to lose hope or believe your life is “over.” Life is continually calling us to awaken. We must be open and aware of the deep woundings, destructive beliefs, and negative habits that can keep us frozen in a counterfeit life so we can choose our authentic greatness. More
What many people in modern society don’t yet appreciate is that the way to gauge an animal’s intelligence is not by asking that animal to figure out a contextual problem, by testing the animal’s memory, nor any other method that is commonly used today. It is by looking at how animals live. More
Mystical or spiritual phenomena present people with a glimpse of the other side—of the “real” world. They can occur through meditation, prayer, nature, near-death experiences, or in many other ways. Occasionally they occur during sleep, in dreams, and in that period of time just before falling asleep or awakening, before consciousness is reached. The glimpses that [mystical experiences] provide us are extremely valuable, for they offer insight into the true nature of mind and of being. —Brian Weiss More
Omega: Can you talk about your experience with Lyme disease and describe how you used mindfulness to help you heal? More
Omega: Your work has been sponsored by the American Cancer Society, the Mayo Clinic, Health Canada, and numerous universities. What’s been the most surprising finding or most successful qigong treatment you discovered when working within the Western medical field? More
Omega: You are the founder and director of the Hard & the Soft Yoga Institute. What is the significance of that name? More
Omega: You are a former neurofeedback researcher with a degree in English and philosophy. How did you first find yoga? More
Omega: What's going on in the body when we start to feel anxious? Judson: Why don’t you tell me? What goes on in your body when you start to feel anxious? Omega: It depends on what I'm anxious about. I might have butterflies in my stomach, my palms might sweat, my face might flush. There are a lot of physical reactions happening. These physical sensations that we label “anxiety” have one thing in common: they make us feel contracted. —Judson Brewer More
Over the last decade there has been an explosion of new findings and public interest in neuroscience. However, most books and resources don’t demonstrate and explain in practical and concrete terms how these discoveries apply to everyday life experiences. My challenge, as a brain geek and mind-hacker, was to find a way to make sense of all this information and create a practical approach that I could use myself as well as share more broadly, especially with audiences without in-depth scientific training and knowledge, such as students in inner-city high schools. More