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Learning paths content lists

Jamia Wilson, feminist media organizer and Executive Director of Women, Action, and the Media, in conversation with journalist Nadia Al-Sakkaf, describes how she learned to embrace what set her apart. More
Elizabeth Gilbert, best-selling author and speaker, describes what she would say to her 15 year-old self about making mistakes and taking risks. More
Joan Halifax Roshi, Zen Buddhist priest, author, and founder of the Ojai Foundation and Upaya Zen Center, describes the two "streams" of socially engaged Buddhism. More
Alice Walker, the author, poet, and activist, describes a lifelong and determined journey of seeing, born from a fear of blindness in early childhood. More
Sally Field, Academy Award-winning actress, tells an intimate story of facing her most intense experience of fear to claim a place of belonging. More
Psychic medium Tony Stockwell has learned how to communicate with the spirit world by surrendering to the feeling that surrounds him, allowing it to bubble up into his consciousness and then saying what he feels is right. In this video he describes his process of connecting with spirits, and how it has evolved through the years. More
Hear the story of a feud involving at-risk teens, stolen bikes, and a pair of bolt cutters. Holistic Life Foundation cofounder Atman Smith provides a real life example of how minfulness can be a useful tool for conflict resolution.   More
Marcia Ann Gillespie, author, editor, and activist, describes the spiritual context that runs through all her work and relationships. More
Carlos Andrés Gómez, award-winning poet, actor, and writer, describes his "click moment" as a young man discovering poetry, how a poem can change a life, and how each of us can contribute to shifting the cutlture of gender. More
Qigong master Robert Peng shares simple qigong exercises to activate your energy, cultivate your qi, and relieve tension. More
Not everyone knows what they want to be when they grow up, but at 8, Kasha Dziewisz knew. She wanted to be a fashion designer and artist. Color, form, and art captured her attention and youthful imagination. “Color has been the backbone of all I do. It’s a motivator for me and makes me feel happy. Even around the house, I always like to have fresh flowers. Sometimes I’ll arrange a bowl of fruit next to it and then end up drawing or painting it,” says Kasha. More
Trauma-informed yoga is based on a particular understanding of trauma, one that emphasizes its impact on the entire mind-body system, as opposed to particular mental states (e.g., troubling memories) viewed in isolation from the physical body. “Trauma,” Bessel van der Kolk explains, “is not just an event that took place sometime in the past; it is also the imprint left by that experience on mind, brain, and body.” More
The universe is conscious. I first recognized this two decades ago when I began engaging a number of alternative healing techniques to overcome my own childhood trauma—trauma which was complex and deep, far too complex for traditional psychotherapy to conveniently unwind. As I engaged these techniques, which ranged from shamanic healing to rebirthing to energy healing, I noticed quick and radical changes that were very positive begin to happen in my own life. More
Omega: Your work has been funded by the National Institute of Mental Health and the Canadian Institutes for Health Research. What have you learned in working with and training professionals in the mental health world? Zindel: It’s been really interesting that some of the initial requests we made of professionals have been embraced with increasing acceptance. More
Omega: How can we learn to settle our minds when the world around us is so full of news, information, social media, and more? More
I felt a sharp sting as my body smashed into the water and then the muddy bottom three feet below. Struggling and sputtering, I was able to claw my way up onto the bank. In a rush of shock and adrenaline, I threw myself at the cliffside and began to climb, hand over hand, my feet scrambling for toeholds. When I slid down a few feet, it only triggered a more zealous effort, as if some reptilian part of me had taken command. Fingers bleeding, both knees skinned, my jeans and T-shirt torn and splattered with dirt, I reached the top and lay panting. More
two people doing warrior pose on beach in sunset
Omega: What motivated you to join the military? More
Self-hatred is the hidden underbelly of all the violence and nastiness in the world. Self-hatred may seem like too strong a word to some. "I have a little self-doubt," you may say, "but I don't hate myself." Yet if you doubt, judge, or criticize yourself at all, this indicates some dislike or aversion toward yourself as you are. Or if you have a hard time spending time alone, undistracted by work, phone calls, television, computers, or other forms of busyness that pull your attention away from yourself, this suggests that you don't like being with yourself that much. More
You can work on undoing an unhealthy habit by exercising present-moment awareness at three distinct times: before the impulse to engage in the habit arises, during the impulse to engage in the habit, and after the impulse to engage in the habit has subsided (or been indulged). Here’s how it works. Before: Explore what leads you to engage in the habit and make choices that can help prevent you from doing so. More